Catherine Davis

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For other people named Katherine Davis, see Katherine Davis (disambiguation).
Catherine Davis
Born 1924
Minneapolis, MN
Died 2002

Catherine Davis (1924–2002) was an American poet. Born in Minneapolis, Minnesota,[1] she studied poetry with J. V. Cunningham at the University of Chicago, and, at Stanford University, with Yvor Winters, graduating in 1951.[2] Davis received her bachelor's degree from George Washington University in 1961, at the age of 37, and subsequently joined the University of Iowa's prestigious creative writing program.[3] The poet Donald Justice, whom she met while at Iowa, was a lifelong champion of her work.[4] UCLA poet Edgar Bowers compared her work favorably to that of Dorothy Parker.[5] Davis held the Stegner Fellowship in Creative Writing at Stanford.[6] She taught at several universities.

Davis published four works:[7]

  • The Leaves: Lyrics and Epigrams (Bembo Press, 1960)
  • Second Beginnings & Other Poems (The King’s Quair Press, 1961)
  • Under This Lintel (King’s Quair Press, 1962)
  • Looking In and Looking Out, R. L. Barth (1999).

Davis died in 2002 of complications related to Alzheimer's disease. She died intestate, leaving the copyrights to her works in limbo.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Versed in school of hard knocks, poet to get posthumous homage on campus". Stanford News. 2008-04-22. Retrieved 2015-01-29. 
  2. ^ "Iambics in Limbo". Stanford Magazine. Retrieved 2015-01-29. 
  3. ^ "Versed in school of hard knocks, poet to get posthumous homage on campus". Stanford News. 2008-04-22. Retrieved 2015-01-29. 
  4. ^ "Versed in school of hard knocks, poet to get posthumous homage on campus". Stanford News. 2008-04-22. Retrieved 2015-01-29. 
  5. ^ "Versed in school of hard knocks, poet to get posthumous homage on campus". Stanford News. 2008-04-22. Retrieved 2015-01-29. 
  6. ^ "Catherine Davis". LAVENDER REVIEW. Retrieved 2015-01-29. 
  7. ^ "Catherine Davis". LAVENDER REVIEW. Retrieved 2015-01-29. 
  8. ^ "Versed in school of hard knocks, poet to get posthumous homage on campus". Stanford News. 2008-04-22. Retrieved 2015-01-29. 

External links[edit]