Catherine J. Bell

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Catherine J. Bell
Catherine Bell.jpg
Member of the Canadian Parliament
for Vancouver Island North
In office
2006 – 2008
Preceded by John Duncan
Succeeded by John Duncan
Personal details
Born (1954-10-25) October 25, 1954 (age 60)
Comox, British Columbia
Political party New Democratic Party
Spouse(s) Roger Kishi
Residence Cumberland, British Columbia
Profession Administrator, cook, labour and social activist

Catherine J. Bell (born October 25, 1954, Comox, British Columbia) is a Canadian trade unionist and politician. She was elected as the New Democratic Party's candidate in the 2006 federal election in the riding of Vancouver Island North, serving for one term. While in Parliament, she served as the NDP's critic for natural resources.

Bell lives with her husband, Roger Kishi, in Cumberland, British Columbia. She previously served as vice-president of the B.C. Government and Service Employees Union. She is a member of the Social Planning and Research Council of B.C. and she has served on the social justice committee of the B.C. Federation of Labour. She is also a member and volunteer with the World Community Development Education Society, Co-Development Canada, the Comox Valley Coalition to Save Social Programs and the Comox Valley Women to Women Global Strategies.

Bell has continued with electoral reform work in parliament championed by Ed Broadbent in the 38th Canadian Parliament through a defeated bill [1] and petition.[2]

In the 2004 federal election, she finished second in Vancouver Island North, losing to Conservative Party of Canada incumbent John Duncan by 483 votes. In the 2006 federal election she defeated Duncan by 630 votes (23561 to 22931). However, in the 2008 election, she was unseated by Duncan by over 2400 votes.

A record of Bell's statements in the House is available.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ IN THE MEDIA: Bell undeterred after bill defeated in Parliament vote | NDP
  2. ^ Everyone Matters, Every Vote Counts - The Campaign for Voter Equality | NDP
  3. ^ "Catherine Bell". openparliament.ca. Retrieved 2013-02-22. 

External links[edit]