Caxton Club

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Caxton Club
Formation January 26, 1895; 120 years ago (1895-01-26)[1]
Type Social club
Purpose To promote the book arts and the history of the book
Headquarters 60 W. Walton St., Chicago, Illinois
Location
  • Chicago, Illinois
President
Susan R. Hanes[2]
Main organ
Council
Website www.caxtonclub.org

The Caxton Club is a private social club and bibliophilic society founded in Chicago in 1895 to promote the book arts and the history of the book. To further its goals, the club holds monthly (September through June) dinner meetings and luncheons, sponsors bibliophile events (often in collaboration with the Newberry Library) and exhibitions, and publishes books, exhibition catalogs, and a monthly journal, The Caxtonian.[3][4][5][6][7][8] The Caxton Club is a member club of the Fellowship of American Bibliophilic Societies.[9]

History[edit]

The Caxton Club was founded in 1895 by a group of fifteen bibliophiles to support the publication of fine books in the style of the then-new Arts and Crafts Movement.[10] The club's name honors the fifteenth-century English printer William Caxton.[11]

The Caxton Club flourished until World War I, after which its membership declined. The club was revived, however, and began to hold regular monthly meetings. The club was exclusively for men until 1976 when the first women were elected to membership.[11]

Notable members[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Caxton Club". Chicago Daily Tribune. December 8, 1895. 
  2. ^ "Officers". Caxton Club. Retrieved December 14, 2013. 
  3. ^ "Meetings & Speakers Schedule". Caxton Club. Retrieved March 28, 2010. 
  4. ^ "Bibliophile Events". Caxton Club. Retrieved March 28, 2010. 
  5. ^ "Exhibitions". Caxton Club. Retrieved March 28, 2010. 
  6. ^ Johnson, Dirk (February 20, 2011). "Book Lovers Fear Dim Future for Notes in the Margins". New York Times. Retrieved February 21, 2011. 
  7. ^ "Publications". Caxton Club. Retrieved March 28, 2010. 
  8. ^ "Caxtonian". Caxton Club. Retrieved March 28, 2010. 
  9. ^ "Fellowship of American Bibliophilic Societies Member Clubs". Fellowship of American Bibliophilic Societies. Retrieved April 3, 2012. 
  10. ^ Gehl, Paul. "Book Arts". Electronic Encyclopedia of Chicago. Retrieved March 28, 2010. 
  11. ^ a b c "History". Caxton Club. Retrieved March 28, 2010. 
  12. ^ Marquis, Albert Nelson, ed. (1908). Who's Who in America: A Biographical Dictionary of Notable Living Men and Women of the United States: 1908–1909 (PDF). Chicago: A. N. Marquis & Company. p. 239. Retrieved March 28, 2010. 
  13. ^ Richardson, John (February 2000). "Butler, Lee Pierce". American National Biography Online. Retrieved March 29, 2010. 
  14. ^ Marquis, Albert Nelson, ed. (1908). Who's Who in America: A Biographical Dictionary of Notable Living Men and Women of the United States: 1908–1909 (PDF). Chicago: A. N. Marquis & Company. p. 530. Retrieved March 28, 2010. 
  15. ^ Marquis, Albert Nelson, ed. (1908). Who's Who in America: A Biographical Dictionary of Notable Living Men and Women of the United States: 1908–1909 (PDF). Chicago: A. N. Marquis & Company. p. 579. Retrieved March 28, 2010. 
  16. ^ Marquis, Albert Nelson, ed. (1908). Who's Who in America: A Biographical Dictionary of Notable Living Men and Women of the United States: 1908–1909 (PDF). Chicago: A. N. Marquis & Company. p. 669. Retrieved March 28, 2010. 
  17. ^ Marquis, Albert Nelson, ed. (1908). Who's Who in America: A Biographical Dictionary of Notable Living Men and Women of the United States: 1908–1909 (PDF). Chicago: A. N. Marquis & Company. p. 1699. Retrieved March 28, 2010. 
  18. ^ Caxtonian XXI (6)
  19. ^ "Books We Finished XV: The Caxton Club Revels Auction, December 20, 2013" (PDF). Caxton Club. p. [16]. Retrieved December 14, 2013. 
  20. ^ "Caxton Club Directory". Retrieved August 4, 2014. 
  21. ^ a b "New Members Admitted During 2010–2011". The Caxtonian 19 (8): 5. August 2011. 
  22. ^ "Caxtonian Footnotes". The Caxtonian 22 (5): 12. May 2014. 
  23. ^ Twombly, Robert (1979). Frank Lloyd Wright: His Life and His Architecture. New York: Wiley. p. 33. ISBN 0-471-85797-1. 

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]