Cearense dialect

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North coast dialect
Dialeto da costa norte
Pronunciation dʒia'lɛtu 'dɐ 'kɔʃtɐ 'nɔhtʃi
Native to North and northwest of Ceará, north of Piauí and northeast of Maranhão
Native speakers
8½ million  (date missing)[citation needed]
Language codes
ISO 639-3
Glottolog None
Linguasphere 51-AAA-am
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North coast dialect Portuguese: dialeto da costa norte pronounced: [dʒia'lɛtu 'dɐ 'kɔʃtɐ 'nɔhtʃi], also called cearense dialect, is a dialect of Portuguese in the Brazilian state of Ceará, having many internal variations, like in the regions Jaguaribe and Sertões (backcountries).

Main characteristics[edit]

  • Preference for the pronoun "tu" instead of "você" (both mean "you"), without distinction of formal and informal speech.[1]
  • Opening of pre-tonic vowels [e] and [o] to [ɛ] and [ɔ], but always obeying a rule of vowel harmony.[2][3]
  • Exchange of [ʎ] and [ɲ] to [i], and reduction of syllables that have these phonemes, represented in Portuguese by "lh" and "nh", respectively.[4]
  • Stronger or low "r" sound, depending on their syllabic position (generally strong at the beginning and middle of words, and weak final syllables). At end of words, "r" consonant is not pronounced.
  • Change of [e] and [ẽ] to [i] or [ĩ] and [o] and [õ] to [u] or [ũ].
  • Palatalization of fricatives [s] and [z] to [ʃ] or [ʒ], just before the letters "t" and "d" after these letters.
  • In Fortaleza and metropolitan area, Ceará North and Ceará Northeast, and close winterland regions, this group there palatalization phonetic, getting affricates to [dʒi] and [tʃi].
  • Stronger "r" is largest uttilizate ([ɦ]), and also undermining of phonemes [ʒ], [v] and [z] to [ɦ].[5]
  • Their own words this dialect, which led many authors to write books of various dictionaries such expressions.[6] This, perhaps, is the mark of people of Ceará, with their antics and lots of humor. Examples: "marminino" (indicates surprise or astonishment, admiration), "abirobado" (something like crazy).[7][8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Freire, Gilson Costa. A REALIZAÇÃO DO ACUSATIVO E DO DATIVO ANAFÓRICOS DE TERCEIRA PESSOA NA ESCRITA BRASILEIRA E LUSITANA. 2005
  2. ^ "Sobre as vogais pré-tônicas no Português Brasileiro". gel.org.br. Retrieved 23 April 2012. 
  3. ^ "VARIAÇÃO INTER- E INTRA-DIALETAL NO PORTUGUÊS BRASILEIRO: UM PROBLEMA PARA A TEORIA FONOLÓGICA". ich.pucminas.br. Retrieved 23 April 2012. 
  4. ^ "A DESPALATALIZAÇÃO E CONSEQÜENTE IOTIZAÇÃO NO FALAR DE FORTALEZA". profala.ufc.br. Retrieved 23 April 2012. 
  5. ^ "A NEUTRALIZAÇÃO DOS FONEMAS / v – z - Z / NO FALAR DE FORTALEZA". profala.ufc.br. Retrieved 23 April 2012. 
  6. ^ MONTEIRO, José Lemos. Fontes bibliográficas para o estudo do dialeto cearense. Revista da Academia Cearense da Língua Portuguesa. Fortaleza, 9 : 68-94, 1995
  7. ^ "Avexado Dicionário Cearês". web.archive.org. Archived from the original on 18 January 2009. Retrieved 23 April 2012. 
  8. ^ "Dicionário Cearês Girias Ceará ABC Cearense". dicionarioceares.vilabol.uol.com.br. Archived from the original on 1 December 2008. Retrieved 23 April 2012.