Cedar City Regional Airport

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Cedar City Regional Airport
CDC airport logo.jpg
IATA: CDCICAO: KCDCFAA LID: CDC
Summary
Airport type Public
Owner Cedar City Corporation
Serves Cedar City, Utah
Elevation AMSL 5,622 ft / 1,714 m
Coordinates 37°42′03″N 113°05′56″W / 37.70083°N 113.09889°W / 37.70083; -113.09889Coordinates: 37°42′03″N 113°05′56″W / 37.70083°N 113.09889°W / 37.70083; -113.09889
Website CedarCity.org/...
Map
CDC is located in Utah
CDC
CDC
Location in Utah
Runways
Direction Length Surface
ft m
2/20 8,653 2,637 Asphalt
8/26 4,822 1,470 Asphalt
Statistics (2011)
Aircraft operations 30,065
Based aircraft 67
Source: Federal Aviation Administration[1]

Cedar City Regional Airport (IATA: CDCICAO: KCDCFAA LID: CDC) is two miles northwest of Cedar City, in Iron County, Utah. It is owned by the Cedar City Corporation.[1] Airline flights are subsidized by the Essential Air Service program.

Federal Aviation Administration records say the airport had 7,776 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2008,[2] 5,486 in 2009 and 5,997 in 2010.[3] The National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015 categorized it as a non-primary commercial service airport (between 2,500 and 10,000 enplanements per year).[4]

History[edit]

SkyWest Airlines provided Essential Air Service (EAS) from 1972 until 2005 when Air Midwest, a subsidiary of Mesa Airlines was awarded the contract.[5] Mayor Gerald Sherratt was quoted as saying “This is not good” when told the news about Mesa being awarded the contract.[6] Citizens wrote to senator Orrin Hatch which prompted him in 2007 to write a letter to the United States Department of Transportation to urge them to select a new carrier to provide air service to Cedar City.[7] Late in 2007, Mesa filed to discontinue service to Cedar City,[8] and a new contract was awarded to SkyWest.[9]

Western Airlines flew to Cedar City in the 1940s; Bonanza Air Lines DC-3s replaced them in 1957-58. Bonanza Fairchild F-27s flew Phoenix - Precott - Grand Canyon Airport - Page - Cedar City - Salt Lake City. Successor Air West/Hughes Airwest continued with F-27s, later flying between Cedar City and Las Vegas. Hughes Airwest dropped Cedar City in 1977.

SkyWest served Cedar City with 19-seat Fairchild Swearingen Metroliners, then 30-seat Embraer EMB-120 Brasilias. SkyWest now flies 50 seat Canadair regional jets as Delta Connection nonstop to Salt Lake City.

Facilities[edit]

The airport covers 1,040 acres (421 ha) at an elevation of 5,622 feet (1,714 m). It has two asphalt runways: 2/20 is 8,653 by 150 feet (2,637 x 46 m) and 8/26 is 4,822 by 60 feet (1,470 x 18 m).[1]

In the year ending January 1, 2011 the airport had 30,065 aircraft operations, average 82 per day: 72% general aviation, 15% air taxi, 12% airline, and 1% military. 67 aircraft were then based at the airport: 78% single-engine, 16% multi-engine, 2% jet, and 5% helicopter.[1]

Airlines and Other Businesses on Airport[edit]

Scheduled passenger service:

Airlines Destinations
Delta Connection Salt Lake City

Other Businesses on Airport:

SyberJet Aircraft | Manufacturer of SJ30i and SJ30x

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d FAA Airport Master Record for CDC (Form 5010 PDF). Federal Aviation Administration. Effective May 31, 2012.
  2. ^ "Enplanements for CY 2008" (PDF, 1.0 MB). CY 2008 Passenger Boarding and All-Cargo Data. Federal Aviation Administration. December 18, 2009. 
  3. ^ "Enplanements for CY 2010" (PDF, 189 KB). CY 2010 Passenger Boarding and All-Cargo Data. Federal Aviation Administration. October 4, 2011. 
  4. ^ "2011–2015 NPIAS Report, Appendix A" (PDF, 2.03 MB). National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems. Federal Aviation Administration. October 4, 2010. 
  5. ^ Romero, McKenzie (February 8, 2006). "Mesa plans flights to SLC". SUU News. Retrieved August 14, 2009. 
  6. ^ Perkins, Nancy (January 27, 2006). "Cedar City laments loss of S.L. flights". High Beam Research (Deseret News). Retrieved August 14, 2009. 
  7. ^ Beebe, Paul (May 31, 2007). "Mesa Air wants to back out of flying to Utah cities.". High Beam Research (The Salt Lake Tribune). Retrieved August 14, 2009. 
  8. ^ "Airline to end service to Cedar City". NewsLibrary.com (Deseret News). May 28, 2007. Retrieved August 14, 2009. 
  9. ^ "2007-10-7 Order Selecting Carriers and Establishing Subsidy Rates (DOT-OST-2003-16395)". Regulations.gov. United States Department of Transportation. October 4, 2007. Retrieved August 14, 2009. 

Other sources[edit]

  • Essential Air Service documents (Docket OST-2003-16395) from the U.S. Department of Transportation:
    • Order 2003-12-9 (December 8, 2003): reselecting SkyWest Airlines, Inc. d/b/a Delta Connection, to provide essential air service at Cedar City, Utah, at an annual subsidy rate of $770,285, for two years beginning January 1, 2004, through December 31, 2005.
    • Order 2006-1-19 (January 25, 2006): selecting Mesa Air Group, Inc., d/b/a Air Midwest, to provide essential air service (EAS) with 19-passenger Raytheon/Beechcraft B-1900D aircraft at Cedar City, Utah, for two years. The annual subsidy rate will be set at $897,535. We are also directing SkyWest Airlines, Inc., to show cause why we should not set the subsidy rate of $1,068,607 on an annual basis, for its provision of service from January 1, 2006, until Air Midwest inaugurates essential air service at Cedar City.
    • Order 2007-10-7 (October 4, 2007): selecting SkyWest Airlines, and Great Lakes Aviation, Ltd. to provide subsidized essential air service (EAS) at the above communities for the two-year period beginning when the carriers inaugurate full EAS. Specifically, we select SkyWest at Cedar City for the annual subsidy of $1,242,256 and Great Lakes at Merced, Visalia, Ely, Moab and Vernal for a combined annual subsidy of $5,670,244.
    • Order 2009-11-7 (November 5, 2009): re-selected SkyWest Airlines to provide essential air service at Cedar City, Utah, at an annual subsidy rate of $1,477,125 for the two-year period from January 1, 2010, through December 31, 2011. Such subsidy is calculated and distributed on a fiscal year basis, subject to the availability of appropriated funds.
    • Order 2011-9-10 (September 15, 2011): re-selecting SkyWest Airlines, operating as Delta Connection, to provide essential air service (EAS) at Cedar City, Utah, using 50-seat Canadair Regional Jet 200 aircraft for a two-year period beginning January 1, 2012, through December 31, 2013, for an annual subsidy of $2,273,395.
    • Order 2012-3-11 (March 20, 2012): approving the request of SkyWest Airlines, operating as Delta Connection to temporarily delay upgrading aircraft at Cedar City, Utah, to 50-passenger Canadair Jet 200 (CRJ200) aircraft from 30-passenger Embraer Brasilia (EMB120) aircraft, effective January 1, 2012, until further notice, and adjusting their annual subsidy to $1,859,403.

External links[edit]