Cedarville, California

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Cedarville
census-designated place
Satellite Imagery of Cedarville, California. Taken on September 29, 1999
Satellite Imagery of Cedarville, California. Taken on September 29, 1999
Cedarville is located in California
Cedarville
Cedarville
Location in California
Coordinates: 41°31′45″N 120°10′24″W / 41.52917°N 120.17333°W / 41.52917; -120.17333Coordinates: 41°31′45″N 120°10′24″W / 41.52917°N 120.17333°W / 41.52917; -120.17333
Country  United States
State  California
County Modoc
Area[1]
 • Total 5.445 sq mi (14.104 km2)
 • Land 5.441 sq mi (14.093 km2)
 • Water 0.004 sq mi (0.011 km2)  0.08%
Elevation[2] 4,652 ft (1,418 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 514
 • Density 94/sq mi (36/km2)
Time zone Pacific (PST) (UTC-8)
 • Summer (DST) PDT (UTC-7)
ZIP Code 96104
Area code(s) 530
GNIS feature ID 220805; 2582971
U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Cedarville, California; U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Cedarville, California

Cedarville (formerly, Surprise Valley and Deep Creek)[3] is a census-designated place[4] located 20 miles (32 km) east of Alturas,[3] at an elevation of 4,652 feet (1,418 m),[2] in Modoc County, California.[2]

Geography[edit]

Cedarville is located at 41°31' North, 120°10' West (41.31, -120.17).

According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP covers an area of 5.4 square miles (14 km2), 99.92% of it land, and 0.08% of it water.

The largest in Surprise Valley, Cedarville is located on the alluvial apron at the mouth of Cedar Canyon, on the eastern base of the Warner Mountains, near the western shore of Middle Alkali Lake.[5]

Climate[edit]

This region experiences warm (but not hot) and dry summers, with no average monthly temperatures above 71.6 °F. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Cedarville has a warm-summer Mediterranean climate, abbreviated "Csb" on climate maps.[6]

History[edit]

Originally known as Deep Creek, Cedarville was founded around 1864 as a stopping place for wagon trains. In 1867 a trading post was being run by William Cressler and John Bonner, who later also built the first road over Cedar Pass, which connected Surprise Valley to Alturas and the rest of Modoc County.

The first post office opened in 1869.[3] The current name is derived from Cedarville, Ohio.[3] As branch county seat of Siskiyou County, nearby Lake City was the population center of Surprise Valley until Modoc County formed in 1874. However, by 1880 Cedarville was the largest in the valley, with a population of around 220,[7] and once Fort Bidwell, 20 miles (32 km) to the north was demilitarized, Cedarville's central location and access to Cedar Pass made it the natural population and business center of the valley.[8]

By 1880 Cedarville was the largest town in Surprise Valley, with a population of around 220.[7]

A 1913 book described Cedarville as being on Middle Alkali Lake and having a population of about 500.[9] The Laxague Lumber Company mill was located in Cedarville, and employed from 18 to 60 residents.[5]

Demographics[edit]

2010[edit]

The 2010 United States Census[10] reported that Cedarville had a population of 514. The population density was 94.4 people per square mile (36.4/km²). The racial makeup of Cedarville was 422 (82.1%) White, 1 (0.2%) African American, 15 (2.9%) Native American, 0 (0.0%) Asian, 0 (0.0%) Pacific Islander, 59 (11.5%) from other races, and 17 (3.3%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 86 persons (16.7%).

The Census reported that 490 people (95.3% of the population) lived in households, 2 (0.4%) lived in non-institutionalized group quarters, and 22 (4.3%) were institutionalized.

There were 237 households, out of which 55 (23.2%) had children under the age of 18 living in them, 98 (41.4%) were opposite-sex married couples living together, 21 (8.9%) had a female householder with no husband present, 13 (5.5%) had a male householder with no wife present. There were 19 (8.0%) unmarried opposite-sex partnerships, and 1 (0.4%) same-sex married couples or partnerships. 92 households (38.8%) were made up of individuals and 51 (21.5%) had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.07. There were 132 families (55.7% of all households); the average family size was 2.71.

The population was spread out with 94 people (18.3%) under the age of 18, 31 people (6.0%) aged 18 to 24, 104 people (20.2%) aged 25 to 44, 149 people (29.0%) aged 45 to 64, and 136 people (26.5%) who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 49.5 years. For every 100 females there were 89.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.4 males.

There were 294 housing units at an average density of 54.0 per square mile (20.8/km²), of which 146 (61.6%) were owner-occupied, and 91 (38.4%) were occupied by renters. The homeowner vacancy rate was 1.3%; the rental vacancy rate was 12.5%. 296 people (57.6% of the population) lived in owner-occupied housing units and 194 people (37.7%) lived in rental housing units.

2000[edit]

At the United States 2000 Census,[11] there were 849 people, 374 households, and 236 families residing with a population density of 3.2 per 1 square mile (2.6 km2) within Zip Code 96104, not all of which is within Cedarville. There were 465 housing units at an average density of 1.6 per 1 square mile (2.6 km2). The racial makeup of the city was 90.3% White, 0.1% African American, 3.8% Native American, 0.7% Asian, 0.0% Pacific Islander, 3.1% from other races, and 2.0% from two or more races. 8.5% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.[11]

There were 374 households out of which 23.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.5% were married couples living together, 8.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.9% were non-families. The average household size was 2.21.[11]

The median age was 46.6, of which 50.1% were men and 49.9% were women.[11] For both sexes, the age distribution was: less than 5 years, 4.8%; 5 to 9 years, 6.7%; 10 to 14 years, 5.7%; 15 to 19 years, 6.2%; 20 to 24 years, 3.1%; 25 to 34 years, 8.2%; 35 to 44 years, 12.5%; 45 to 54 years, 18.1%; 55 to 59 years, 6.8%; 60 to 64 years, 4.1%; 65 to 74 years, 11.7%; 75 to 84 years, 9.1%; and 85 years and over, 2.9%.[11]

The average income for a household in the town was $34,265.[12] Males had a median income of $37,136 versus $19,083 for females. The per capita income for the town was $20,412. 18.5% of the population and 14.1% of families were below the poverty line.[13]

Economy[edit]

The town hosts an annual Last Frontier Fair in August.[14] Tourist services, such as bed and breakfast accommodations, are available in the community. An area attraction is the Warner Mountains, most of which are inside Modoc National Forest, and the headquarters of the Warner Mountain Ranger District is in downtown Cedarville.[15]

Government[edit]

In the state legislature, Cedarville is in the 1st Senate District, represented by Republican Ted Gaines,[16] and the 1st Assembly District, represented by Republican Brian Dahle.[17]

Federally, Cedarville is in California's 1st congressional district, represented by Republican Doug LaMalfa.[18]

Education[edit]

Public schools in Cedarville are administered the Surprise Valley Joint Unified District and includes the Surprise Valley High School as well the Surprise Valley Elementary and Middle School.[19]

Infrastructure[edit]

The ZIP code for Cedarville is 96104. Wired telephone numbers in Cedarville follow the format (530) 279-2xxx or 279-6xxx. Wired telephone service is provided by Frontier Communications. Cedarville Hospital, operated by the Surprise Valley Hospital District, is located on Main Street at Washington. Cedarville Airport is located along Surprise Valley Road 1.5 miles (2.4 km) north of California State Route 299.

Notable people[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ U.S. Census
  2. ^ a b c U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Cedarville, California
  3. ^ a b c d Durham, David L. (1998). California's Geographic Names: A Gazetteer of Historic and Modern Names of the State. Clovis, Calif.: Word Dancer Press. p. 363. ISBN 1-884995-14-4. 
  4. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Cedarville, California
  5. ^ a b Pease, Robert W. (1965). Modoc County; University of California Publications in Geography, Volume 17. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press. p. 276. 
  6. ^ Climate Summary for Cedarville, California
  7. ^ a b "Cedarville". Greater Surprise Valley Chamber of Commerce. Archived from the original on 2006-02-07. Retrieved 2010-04-04. 
  8. ^ Pease, Robert W. (1965). Modoc County; University of California Publications in Geography, Volume 17. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press. pp. 82,96,97,136. 
  9. ^ Drury, Wells; Drury, Aubrey (1913). California tourist guide and handbook: authentic description of routes of travel and points of interest in California. Western guidebook company. p. 249. Retrieved 2009-06-16. 
  10. ^ "2010 Census Interactive Population Search: CA - Cedarville CDP". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved July 12, 2014. 
  11. ^ a b c d e Zip Code 96104 Data, ZipCodes.com, 2013
  12. ^ Cedarville, CA Demographic information, ZipCodes.com, 2013
  13. ^ U.S. 2000 Census data, note: Due to congressional requirements, the federal government has shut down. All Census Bureau data is now offline until the bureau is reopened. Date: October 13, 2013.
  14. ^ Modoc County Last Frontier Fair, National Geographic
  15. ^ Warner Mountain Ranger District, U.S. Forest Service, 2013
  16. ^ "Senators". State of California. Retrieved March 10, 2013. 
  17. ^ "Members Assembly". State of California. Retrieved March 2, 2013. 
  18. ^ "California's 1st Congressional District - Representatives & District Map". Civic Impulse, LLC. Retrieved March 3, 2013. 
  19. ^ Sunrise Valley High School, 2013
  20. ^ Ayers, Michael (May 2000). "From the High Desert". The Pioneer: Samuel Kistler. E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Retrieved 2010-04-04. 
  21. ^ Juillerat, Lee, Beyond the call of duty: Friends, family, community not surprised by Medal of Honor recipient’s heroics, Herald and News February 3, 2013