Cemetery GIS

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Map of Cemetery G I S

This cemetery derives its name from its relative location to pyramid G I (Khufu). The tombs are located on the south side of that pyramid and hence the name G I South Cemetery. Reisner thought the cemetery a continuation of the G7000 cemetery which is part of the Giza East Field. The construction postdates that of mastaba G 7070 of Sneferukhaf. Junker dated the cemetery to the reign of Menkaure based on the presence of granite powder thought to derive from the dressing of the second pyramid at Giza. Reisner allows for a possible construction date dating to the reign of Khafre.[1] This cemetery also contains several stone built mastabas dating to as late as the 6th dynasty. Tombs from the time of Menkaure include the mastabas of the royal chamberlain Khaemnefert, the King’s son Khufudjedef who was master of the royal largesse, and an official named Niankhre.[2]

Mastabas[edit]

The following are a collection of mastabas found in this cemetery. There are also many shafts without any superstructure that belong to this cemetery, but these have not been included in the table.[2]

Tomb number Name of owner Title owner Time Period Comments
G I S No.1
(Mastaba I)
4th dynasty (Menkaure)
G I S No.2
(Mastaba III)
Kaemnefret Royal chamberlain 4th dynasty (Menkaure) The tomb had 3 shafts and a chapel. A granite sarcophagus inscribed for Khaemnefret was found in the burial chamber of shaft S 66.
G I S No.3
(Mastaba IV)
Khufudjedef Master of royal reversion-offerings 4th dynasty (Menkaure) The tomb had 2 shafts and a chapel. A red granite sarcophagus inscribed for Khufudjedef was found in the burial chamber of shaft S 68.
G I S No.4
(LG 52)
Niankhre 4th dynasty (Menkaure)
G I S No.5
(Mastaba VI)
4th dynasty (Menkaure) The mastaba has two burial shafts and a chapel.
G I S No.6
(Mastaba VII)
4th dynasty (Menkaure) The mastaba has two burial shafts and a chapel.
G I S No.8
(Mastaba IX)
Sekhemka Royal chief, judge and administrator, priest of Maat 5th or 6th dynasty (Possibly Unas - Teti) A statue of Sekhemka was found in the chapel. Two sons, named Khaemnefret and Ini, are mentioned in scenes in the chapel.
G I S No.9
(Mastaba X)
4th dynasty (Menkaure) The mastaba has two burial shafts.
G I S No.10
(Mastaba XI)
4th dynasty (Menkaure)

Unnumbered tombs from the G I S cemetery include:[2]

Name of owner Title owner Time period Material Comments
Heneni Overseer and judge of scribes, sole companion, lector-priest 6th dynasty Stone mastaba The tomb has three shafts and a chapel
Isu and Meshedu ka-priests 6th dynasty Mud-brick mastaba The tomb has nine shafts and a chapel
Itjef Inspector of letter carriers 6th dynasty Mud-brick mastaba The tomb has two shafts and three serdabs. ALso known as Junker No. 9
Iymery Royal wab-priest, inspector of royal document scribes of the treasury, inspector of scribes of the royal linen 6th dynasty Stone mastaba The tomb has three shafts, a serdab, and a chapel. The tomb is just off the south of G I-S No. 3
Khenut Royal acquaintance 6th dynasty Stone mastaba The tomb has two shafts, two serdabs, and a chapel.
Khnumnefer Sole companion, keeper of the diadem, inspector of the king's hairdressers 6th dynasty Stone and brick mastaba The tomb has two shafts, two serdabs, and a chapel. Also known as Junker No: S 46
Seshemnefer IV Director of the two thrones in the Mansion of Life, secretary of all secret commands of the king, chief of Bat end of 5th to 6th dynasty (Unas to Teti) Stone mastaba Possibly identical with a man named Seshemnefer in G 5170, who was the eldest son of Seshemnefer III (owner of G 5170). Also known as Lepsius 53. Sons: Ptahetep, Neferseshemptah Sheshi, Seshemnefer Tjeti ?, Shetnu?
Hetepheres Royal acquaintance, revered before her husband, priestess of Neith end of 5th to 6th dynasty Stone mastaba Also known as Lepsius 54. The tomb is linked with Lepsius 53, the tomb of Seshemnefer IV
Niankhre Inspector of physicians of the Great House, priest of Heka, priest of Horus-who-is-in-Shenwet, priest of Anubis-foremost-of-Sepa. Late 5th to 6th dynasty Stone mastaba Also known as Lepsius 55.
Hor Saite Period Also known as Lepsius 101.
Udjahor Psametik-sasekhmet Saite Period Also known as Lepsius 102.
Neferherenptah Royal sealer of the granary Late 5th to 6th dynasty Rock-cut tomb A lintel mentions his wife Nefret, and his children Imgesi, Khuit, Kaemredwy and Keki.
Niankhhathor 6th dynasty Stone Mastaba The tomb contains 5 shafts and 2 serdabs.
Nishenu ka-priest, keeper of the dockyard 6th dynasty Stone Mastaba The tomb contains 3 shafts. Niankhhathor was the wife of Nishenu.
Nisusankh Priest of Khufu, director of members of a phyle, inspector of wab-priests 6th dynasty Stone Mastaba Nisuankh's wife was named Khenut, and his son Nisukhons
Niwehebre 26th dynasty Rock-cut tomb Niwehebre's name was found on his sarcophagus.
Ninutjer 6th dynasty Stone Mastaba Wife: Henutsen, Son: Nunetjer-nedjes, Daughter: Henutsen-nedjeset
Pedesi 26th dynasty Rock-cut tomb
Perniankh Rower of the bark, administrator of the treasury, royal acquaintance 6th dynasty Rock-cut tomb
Ptahhetep Physician of the Great House, inspector of ka-priests 6th dynasty Rock-cut tomb Probably son of Seshemnefer IV
Redenptah 5th - 6th dynasty Rock-cut tomb Wife: Iymerit
Sehetepu Tepu Judge, overseer of scribes 5th - 6th dynasty Stone Mastab Sehetepu Tepu appears several times in the chapel reliefs in the mastaba of Seshemnefer IV. Sons: Senedjemib Imesh, Khenu
Seshemnefer-Tjeti Sole companion, director of the two thrones, chief of Bat 6th dynasty Stone Mastaba Tomb may be part of family complex of Seshemnefer IV.
Tairy 26th dynasty Rock-cut tomb
Tjenti Late 5th to 6th dynasty Rock-cut tomb
Tjeri 26th dynasty Stone Mastaba
Tjetut Royal acquaintance, beloved of her father 6th dynasty Stone Mastaba

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

  • The Giza Archives Website maintained by the Boston Museum of Fine Arts. Quote: "Web site is a comprehensive resource for research on Giza. It contains photographs and other documentation from the original Harvard University- Boston Museum of Fine Arts Expedition (1904 to 1947), from recent MFA fieldwork, and from other expeditions, museums, and universities around the world.".

References[edit]

  1. ^ George A. Reisner, A History of the Giza Necropolis I, Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1942, pp 74, Retrieved from Giza Digital Library: History of the Giza Necropolis Series
  2. ^ a b c Porter, Bertha and Moss, Rosalind, Topographical Bibliography of Ancient Egyptian Hieroglyphic Texts, Statues, Reliefs and Paintings Volume III: Memphis, Part I Abu Rawash to Abusir. 2nd edition (revised and augmented by Dr Jaromir Malek, 1974). Retrieved from gizapyramids.org