Centaurus A/M83 Group

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To be distinguished from Centaurus Cluster or Centaurus Supercluster.
Centaurus A/M83 group
Observation data (Epoch )
Constellation(s) Hydra, Centaurus, and Virgo[1]
Right ascension 13h 20m[2]
Declination −44° 58′[2]
Other designations
See also: Galaxy groups, Galaxy clusters, List of galaxy clusters

The Centaurus A/M83 Group is a complex group of galaxies in the constellations Hydra, Centaurus, and Virgo. The group may be roughly divided into two subgroups. The Cen A Subgroup, at a distance of 11.9 Mly (3.66 Mpc), is centered on Centaurus A, a nearby radio galaxy.[3] The M83 Subgroup, at a distance of 14.9 Mly (4.56 Mpc), is centered on the Messier 83 (M83), a face-on spiral galaxy.[3]

This group is sometimes identified as one group[4][5] and sometimes identified as two groups.[6] Hence, some references will refer to two objects named the Centaurus A Group and the M83 Group. However, the galaxies around Centaurus A and the galaxies around M83 are physically close to each other, and both subgroups appear not to be moving relative to each other.[3]

The Centaurus A/M83 Group is part of the Virgo Supercluster, the local supercluster of which the Local Group is an outlying member.

Members[edit]

Member identification[edit]

The galaxies NGC 5011B and NGC 5011C are imaged against a starry foreground.[7]

The brightest group members were frequently identified in early galaxy group identification surveys.[4][5] However, many of the dwarf galaxies in the group were only identified in more intensive studies. One of the first of these identified 145 faint objects on optical images from the UK Schmidt Telescope and followed these up in hydrogen line emission with the Parkes Radio Telescope and in the hydrogen-alpha spectral line with the Siding Spring 2.3 m Telescope. This identified 20 dwarf galaxies as members of the group.[8] The HIPASS survey, which was a blind radio survey for hydrogen spectral line emission, found five uncatalogued galaxies in the group and also identified five previously-catalogued galaxies as members.[9] An additional dwarf galaxy was identified as a group member in the HIDEEP survey, which was a more intensive radio survey for hydrogen emission within a smaller region of the sky.[10] Several optical surveys later identified 20 more candidate objects to the group.[11][12][13] In 2007, the Cen A group membership of NGC 5011C was established. [14] While this galaxy is a well-known stellar system listed with a NGC number, its true identity remained hidden because of coordinate confusion and wrong redshifts in the literature.

Member list[edit]

The table below lists galaxies that have been identified as associated with the Centaurus A/M83 Group by I. D. Karachentsev and collaborators.[3][13] Note that Karachentsev divides this group into two subgroups centered on Centaurus A and Messier 83.

Members of the Centaurus A Subgroup
Name Type[2] R.A. (J2000)[2] Dec. (J2000)[2] Redshift (km/s)[2] Apparent Magnitude[2]
Cen 7 Sph 13h 11m 13.8s −38° 53′ 56″ 17.3
Cen N 13h 48m 09.1s −47° 33′ 54″ 17.5
Centaurus A (NGC 5128) S0 pec 13h 25m 27.6s −43° 01′ 09″ 547 ± 5 7.8
Centaurus A-dE1 dSph 13h 12m 45.2s −41° 49′ 57″ 19.3
Centaurus A-dE3 dE 13h 46m 00.8s −36° 19′ 44″ 17.1
HIPASS J1337-39 Im 13h 37m 25.3s −39° 53′ 48″ 492 ± 4 16.5
HIPASS J1348-37 13h 48m 47.0s −37° 58′ 29″ 581 ± 8 16.9
HIPASS J1351-47 13h 51m 12.0s −46° 58′ 12.9″ 529 ± 6
KKs 51 E/Sph 12h 44m 21.5s −42° 56′ 23″ 16.7
KKs 55 Sph 13h 22m 12.8s −42° 43′ 41″ 18.5
KKs 57 Sph 13h 41m 38.1s −42° 34′ 55″ 18.1
LEDA 166152 dI 13h 05m 02.1s −40° 04′ 58″ 617 ± 4 16.3
LEDA 166167 dI/dSph 13h 27m 27.8s −45° 21′ 10″ 18
LEDA 166172 dSph 13h 43m 36.0s −43° 46′ 11″ 18.5
LEDA 166175 dSph 13h 46m 16.8s −45° 41′ 05″ 19.2
LEDA 166179 dSph 13h 48m 46.4s −46° 59′ 46″ 18
NGC 4945 SB(s)cd 13h 05m 27.5s −49° 28′ 06″ 563 ± 3 9.3
NGC 5102 SA0 13h 21m 57.6s −36° 37′ 49″ 468 ± 2 10.4
NGC 5206 SB(r)0 13h 33m 44.0s −48° 09′ 04″ 571 ± 10 11.6
NGC 5237 I0 13h 37m 39.0s −42° 50′ 49″ 361 ± 4 13.2
PGC 45104 IABm 13h 03m 33.6s −46° 35′ 06″
PGC 45717 I0 pec 13h 10m 32.9s −46° 59′ 27.3″ 1853 ± 32 13.3
PGC 45916 dE 13h 13m 09.1s −44° 53′ 24″ 784 ± 31 14.1
PGC 46663 IBm 13h 21m 47.4s −45° 03′ 42″ 741 16.1
PGC 46680 Im 13h 22m 02.0s 32° 07′ 16.6
PGC 47171 IABm 13h 27m 37.4s −41° 28′ 50″ 516 ± 3 12.9
PGC 48515 dE 13h 42m 05.6s −45° 12′ 18″ 17.6
PGC 48738 IB(s)m 13h 45m 00.5s −41° 51′ 40″ 545 ± 2 14.0
PGC 49615 dS0/Im 13h 57m 01.4s −35° 19′ 59″ 561 ± 32 14.8
Members of the M83 Subgroup
Name Type[2] R.A. (J2000)[2] Dec. (J2000)[2] Redshift (km/s)[2] Apparent Magnitude[2]
AM 1321-304 dIm 13h 24m 36.2s −30° 58′ 19″ 487 ± 1 16.7
Centaurus A-dE2 dE/Im 13h 21m 32.4s −31° 53′ 11″ 17.6
Centaurus A-dE4 dSph 13h 46m 40.4s −29° 58′ 41″ 19.
HIDEEP J1336-3321 13h 36m 56.1s −33° 21′ 23″ 591 17.3
IC 4247 S 13h 26m 44.4s −30° 21′ 45″ 274 ± 65 14.4
IC 4316 IBm pec 13h 40m 18.4s −28° 53′ 32″ 674 ± 53 15.0
KK 208 dI 13h 36m 35.5s −29° 34′ 17″ 381 14.3
LEDA 166163 dI 13h 21m 08.2s −31° 31′ 45″ 571 ± 3 17.1
LEDA 166164 dSph 13h 22m 56.2s −33° 34′ 22″ 17.6
M83 SAB(s)c 13h 37m 00.9s −29° 51′ 57″ 513 ± 2 8.2
NGC 5253 Im pec 13h 39m 55.9s −31° 38′ 24″ 407 ± 3 10.9
NGC 5264 IB(s)m 13h 41m 36.7s −29° 54′ 47″ 478 ± 3 12.6
PGC 47885 13h 35m 08.1s −30° 07′ 03″ 13848 15.8
PGC 48111 Im 13h 37m 20.0s −28° 02′ 42″ 587 ± 3 15.0
UGCA 365 Im 13h 36m 31.1s −29° 14′ 06″ 573 ± 1 15.4

Additionally, ESO 219-010, PGC 39032, and PGC 51659 are listed as possibly being members of the Centaurus A Subgroup, and ESO 381-018, NGC 5408, and PGC 43048 are listed as possibly being members of the M83 Subgroup.[3] Although HIPASS J1337-39 is only listed as a possible member of the M83 Subgroup in the later list published by Karachentsev,[3] later analyses indicate that this galaxy is within the subgroup.[15] Saviane and Jerjen found that NGC 5011C has an optical redshift of 647 km/s and thus is a member of the Cen A group rather than of the distant Centaurus galaxy cluster as believed since 1983.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kepple, George Robert; Glen W. Sanner (1998). The Night Sky Observer's Guide, Volume 2. Willmann-Bell, Inc. p. 73. ISBN 0-943396-60-3. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o "NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database". Results for NGC 5128 Group. Retrieved 2006-11-22. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f I. D. Karachentsev (2005). "The Local Group and Other Neighboring Galaxy Groups". Astronomical Journal 129 (1): 178–188. arXiv:astro-ph/0410065. Bibcode:2005AJ....129..178K. doi:10.1086/426368. 
  4. ^ a b R. B. Tully (1988). Nearby Galaxies Catalog. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-35299-1. 
  5. ^ a b P. Fouque, E. Gourgoulhon, P. Chamaraux, G. Paturel (1992). "Groups of galaxies within 80 Mpc. II - The catalogue of groups and group members". Astronomy and Astrophysics Supplement 93: 211–233. Bibcode:1992A&AS...93..211F. 
  6. ^ A. Garcia (1993). "General study of group membership. II - Determination of nearby groups". Astronomy and Astrophysics Supplement 100: 47–90. Bibcode:1993A&AS..100...47G. 
  7. ^ "Don’t trust your eyes". ESA/Hubble Picture of the Week. Retrieved 13 February 2013. 
  8. ^ S. Cote, K. C. Freeman, C. Carigan, P. J. Quinn (1997). "Discovery of Numerous Dwarf Galaxies in the Two Nearest Groups of Galaxies". Astronomical Journal 114: 1313. arXiv:astro-ph/9704030. Bibcode:1997AJ....114.1313C. doi:10.1086/118565. 
  9. ^ G. D. Banks, M. J. Disney, P. M. Knezek, H. Jerjen, D. G. Barnes, R. Bhatal, W. J. G. de Blok, P. J. Boyce, R. D. Ekers, K. C. Freeman, B. K. Gibson, P. A. Henning, V. Kilborn, B. Koribalski, R. C. Kraan-Korteweg, D. F. Malin, R. F. Minchin, J. R. Mould, T. Oosterloo, R. M. Price, M. E. Putman, S. D. Ryder, E. M. Sadler, L. Staveley-Smith, I. Stewart, F. Stootman, R. A. Vaile, R. L. Webster, A. E. Wright (1999). "New Galaxies Discovered in the First Blind H I Survey of the Centaurus A Group". Astrophysical Journal 524 (2): 612–622. arXiv:astro-ph/9906146. Bibcode:1999ApJ...524..612B. doi:10.1086/307854. 
  10. ^ R. F. Minchin, M. J. Disney, P. J. Boyce, W. J. G. de Blok, Q. A. Parker, G. D. Banks, K. C. Freeman, D. A. Garcia, B. K. Gibson, M. Grossi, R. F. Haynes, P. M. Knezek, R. H. Lang, D. F. Malin, R. M. Price, I. M. Stewart, A. E. Wright (2003). "HIDEEP - an extragalactic blind survey for very low column-density neutral hydrogen". Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 346 (3): 787–802. arXiv:astro-ph/0308405. Bibcode:2003MNRAS.346..787M. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2003.07134.x. 
  11. ^ H. Jerjen, K. C. Freeman, B. Binggeli (2000). "Testing the Surface Brightness Fluctuations Method for Dwarf Elliptical Galaxies in the Centaurus A Group". Astronomical Journal 119 (1): 166–176. arXiv:astro-ph/9912011. Bibcode:2000AJ....119..166J. doi:10.1086/301188. 
  12. ^ H. Jerjen, K. C. Freeman, B. Binggeli (2000). "Surface BR Photometry of Newly Discovered Dwarf Elliptical Galaxies in the Nearby Sculptor and Centaurus A Groups". Astronomical Society 119 (2): 593–608. Bibcode:2000AJ....119..593J. doi:10.1086/301216. 
  13. ^ a b I. D. Karachentsev, M. E. Sharina, A. E. Dolphin, E. K. Grebel, D. Geisler, P. Guhathakurta, P. W. Hodge, V. E. Karachetseva, A. Sarajedini, P. Seitzer (2002). "New distances to galaxies in the Centaurus A group". Astronomy and Astrophysics 385 (1): 21–31. Bibcode:2002A&A...385...21K. doi:10.1051/0004-6361:20020042. 
  14. ^ I. Saviane, H. Jerjen (2007). "NGC 5011C: An Overlooked Dwarf Galaxy in the Centaurus A Group". Astronomical Journal 133 (4): 1756–1762. arXiv:astro-ph/0701280. Bibcode:2007AJ....133.1756S. doi:10.1086/512157. 
  15. ^ M. Grossi, M. J. Disney, B. J. Pritzl, P. M. Knezek, J. S. Gallagher, R. F. Minchin, K. C> Freeman (2006). "Star formation history and evolution of gas-rich dwarf galaxies in the Centaurus A group". Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 374 (1): 107–130. arXiv:astro-ph/0611106. Bibcode:2007MNRAS.374..107G. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2006.11125.x.