United States Army Public Health Command

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The United States Army Public Health Command (USAPHC) is a United States Army element headquartered at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, United States.[1] As a major subordinate command of the United States Army Medical Command, USAPHC is responsible for providing technical support and expertise in the areas of preventive medicine, public health, health promotion, and wellness to military units around the globe.[2] The USAPHC has five regional commands located at Fort George G. Meade in Maryland; Joint Base San Antonio in Texas; Joint Base Lewis-McChord in Washington; Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Germany; and Camp Zama in Japan.

The Maryland Office of ORAU and Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education administers research participation programs for USAPHC.[3]

The current commander of USAPHC is Major General Dean G. Sienko.[4]

History[edit]

The Army Industrial Hygiene Laboratory was founded in 1942 at the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health under the direct jurisdiction of the Surgeon General of the United States Army.[5] It was charged with conducting occupational health surveys of Army-operated industrial plants, arsenals, and depots.

The laboratory was subsequently renamed the United States Army Environmental Hygiene Agency and its mission was expanded to include support of Department of Defense preventive medicine programs worldwide.

In 1994 the agency was re-designated the United States Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine.[6] In 2010, the center was merged with the United States Army Veterinary Command to form the current USAPHC.[7] USAPHC promotes health and prevents disease, injury, and disability in Soldiers and retirees, their Families, and Army civilians, and provides veterinary medicine services for the Army and Department of Defense. USAPHC provides consulting services to senior military leaders, commanders both deployed and in garrison, and military medical and health professionals.[8]

References[edit]

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