Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy

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Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy
CIDRAP logo
Abbreviation CIDRAP
Formation 2001
Purpose/focus "to prevent illness and death from infectious diseases through epidemiologic research and the rapid translation of scientific information into real-world practical applications and solutions"
Director Michael T. Osterholm
Parent organization Academic Health Center
Affiliations University of Minnesota
Website cidrap.umn.edu

The Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy (CIDRAP) is a center within the University of Minnesota that focuses on addressing public health preparedness and emerging infectious disease response. It was founded in 2001 by Michael Osterholm, PhD, MPH, in order to "prevent illness and death from infectious diseases through epidemiological research and rapid translation of scientific information into real-world practical applications and solutions".[1]

Primary activities[edit]

Minnesota Center of Excellence for Influenza Research and Surveillance (MCEIRS)[edit]

MCEIRS was established by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and CIDRAP in April 2007. The center focuses on the detection, epidemiology, ecology, and transmission of avian influenza (AI) viruses with pandemic potential. MCEIRS is one of six NIH-supported centers[2] in the United States conducting a variety of research and surveillance activities domestically and abroad. The overall goal is to enhance understanding of how AI viruses evolve, adapt, and spread among animal populations and from animals to humans.[3]

MCEIRS initiatives under way in North America and Southeast Asia are aimed at identifying and analyzing AI viruses in wild birds, poultry, swine, and humans having close contact with animals at high risk of infection. Specific goals include:[4]

  • rapid identification and characterization of AI viruses
  • collection and storage of viral isolates
  • provision of genetic and antiviral susceptibility data on highly pathogenic AI viruses
  • targeted research on key questions and information gaps regarding the ecology, natural history, epidemiology, and transmission of avian influenza viruses
  • development of capacity-building education and training programs

BioWatch[edit]

CIDRAP has served as at partner in the federal BioWatch air-monitoring program. This program is responsible for the constant monitoring for potential bioterrorism-related agents in cities throughout the United States.[5] Through its contract with the Department of Homeland Security, CIDRAP provides support for the development of national outdoor and indoor guidance documents, a national epidemiology communications network, and a suite of related program and reference documents.

CIDRAP website[edit]

The CIDRAP website provides daily news updates on emerging infectious diseases, such as Pandemic influenza, BioTerrorism, Food Safety, Avian influenza, and the novel H1N1 influenza A pandemic. Along with news articles, the site provides overviews on various infectious disease topics, as well as lists of selected readings for each topic.[6]

CIDRAP Comprehensive Influenza Vaccine Initiative (CCIVI)[edit]

In December 2009 a grant by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation started the CIDRAP Comprehensive Influenza Vaccine Initiative. The primary goal of CCIVI was to review all all aspects of 2009-2010 H1N1 influenza vaccine preparedness and response and to review the scientific and programmatic basis for the current seasonal influenza vaccine efforts. The final report, published October 15th, 2012, is a review of more than 12,000 peer-reviewed publications, documents, transcripts and notes dating back to 1936 and interviews and follow up with 88 experts in influenza vaccine research, development, and use.[7]

Recognition[edit]

In 2007, CIDRAP News received an Award for Excellence in Health Care Journalism from the Association of Health Care Journalists for its seven-part series, "The Pandemic Vaccine Puzzle." [8]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "Biological Threat Agents Information". Federation of American Scientists. Retrieved December 22, 2011. 
  2. ^ "Centers of Excellence for Influenza Research and Surveillance (CEIRS)". National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Retrieved December 22, 2011. 
  3. ^ "Minnesota Center of Excellence for Influenza Research & Surveillance". Center for Infectious Disease Research & Policy. Retrieved December 22, 2011. 
  4. ^ "MCEIRS overview". Minnesota Center of Excellence for Influenza Research & Surveillance. Retrieved December 22, 2011. 
  5. ^ "BioWatch program aims for nationwide detection of airborne pathogens". Center for Infectious Disease Research & Policy. February 26, 2003. Retrieved December 22, 2011. 
  6. ^ Center for Infectious Disease Research & Policy. University of Minnesota.
  7. ^ Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy. "The Compelling Need for Game-Changing Influenza Vaccines: An Analysis of the Influenza Vaccine Enterprise and Recommendations for the Future". CIDRAP. Retrieved 15 October 2012. 
  8. ^ "AHJC Awards". Association of Health Care Journalists. 

External links[edit]