Central African Republic–China relations

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Central African Republic – China relations
Map indicating locations of Central African Republic and China

Central African Republic

China

Central African Republic–People's Republic of China relations refer to the bilateral relations of the Central African Republic and the People's Republic of China. Diplomatic relations between the People's Republic of China and the Central African Republic were established on September 29, 1964 when the CAR's government severed diplomatic relations with the Republic of China (Taiwan).[1] China's ambassador to the Central African Republic was Shi Hu as of 2005.[2]

History[edit]

Following establishment of relations in 1964, when Jean-Bédel Bokassa came to power in 1966, he switched the nation's recognition back to Taiwan, severing diplomatic ties with the government in Beijing, which lasted until although Bokassa's reversal in 1976. The Central African Republic switched its recognition back to Taipei in 1991 under President André-Dieudonné Kolingba. Kolingba's successor, Ange-Félix Patassé, would switch the CAR's recognition back to the People's Republic of China in 1998, which remained as of 2010. Since 1998, China has delivered much foreign aid to the CAR, including doctors and civil engineers. Trade between China and the CAR has increased in the 2000s (decade), and CAR President François Bozizé Yangouvonda called for more Chinese investment in the country in 2009.[3]

Economic Development[edit]

Since the first Forum on China Africa Cooperation in 2000, the Chinese government has delivered $152 million in development assistance to the Central Africa Republic.[4] Several major Chinese aid projects in the Central African Republic include:

  • A $67.4 million loan from the Exim Bank of China to install fix and mobile networks in the country.[5]
  • Construction of a 20,000 seat stadium in Bangui financed by the Chinese government.[6]
  • The cancellation of $11.4 million in debt owed to China.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Central African Republic". Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the People's Republic of China. 2003-10-12. Retrieved 2009-10-05. 
  2. ^ "Chinese Embassy in Central Africa". Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the People's Republic of China. 2005. Retrieved 2009-10-05. 
  3. ^ "AFP: Central Africa calls on China for investment". Google News. 2009-09-10. Retrieved 2009-10-05. 
  4. ^ Austin Strange, Bradley C. Parks, Michael J. Tierney, Andreas Fuchs, Axel Dreher, and Vijaya Ramachandran. 2013. China’s Development Finance to Africa: A Media-Based Approach to Data Collection. CGD Working Paper 323. Washington DC: Center for Global Development. http://aiddatachina.org/projects?utf8=%E2%9C%93&search=&active_string%5B%5D=Active&country_name%5B%5D=Central+African+Rep.&scope_names%5B%5D=Official+Finance
  5. ^ Austin Strange, Bradley C. Parks, Michael J. Tierney, Andreas Fuchs, Axel Dreher, and Vijaya Ramachandran. 2013. China’s Development Finance to Africa: A Media-Based Approach to Data Collection. CGD Working Paper 323. Washington DC: Center for Global Development. http://aiddatachina.org/projects/147
  6. ^ Austin Strange, Bradley C. Parks, Michael J. Tierney, Andreas Fuchs, Axel Dreher, and Vijaya Ramachandran. 2013. China’s Development Finance to Africa: A Media-Based Approach to Data Collection. CGD Working Paper 323. Washington DC: Center for Global Development. http://aiddatachina.org/projects/352
  7. ^ Austin Strange, Bradley C. Parks, Michael J. Tierney, Andreas Fuchs, Axel Dreher, and Vijaya Ramachandran. 2013. China’s Development Finance to Africa: A Media-Based Approach to Data Collection. CGD Working Paper 323. Washington DC: Center for Global Development. http://aiddatachina.org/projects/381