Central Broward Regional Park

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Central Broward Regional Park and Stadium
CBRegionalPark.jpg
Ground information
Location 3700 NW 11th Place
Lauderhill, Florida 33111
Establishment 9 November 2007
Capacity 20,000 (5,000 fixed, 15,000 berm)
Owner Broward County, Florida
Architect H.J. Russell
Seawood Builders
Operator Broward County
Parks and Recreation Division
Tenants Fort Lauderdale Fighting Squids (USAFL) (2008-present)
South Florida Elite Futbol Club (USYS) (2008-present)
Fort Lauderdale Schulz Academy (USL PDL) (2010-present)
International information
First T20I 22 May 2010: New Zealand v Sri Lanka
Last T20I 1 July 2012: West Indies v New Zealand

Central Broward Regional Park and Stadium is a large municipal park in Lauderhill, Florida, owned and operated by Broward County. It opened on November 9, 2007, at a construction cost of $70 million. It is located at the corner of US 441 and Sunrise Blvd. (SR 838)

Main Event Field[edit]

The Main Event Field features a large circular grass pitch, roughly 167 yards (153 meters) diameter.[1] Surrounding it is a 5,000-seat stadium and large berms capable of holding 15,000 more. It also features stadium lighting and a luxury viewing area. It was designed with cricket in mind.[2]

The first organized cricket event held there was a Twenty20 cricket tournament, the Martin Luther King Twenty20 Cricket Tournament (MLK T20), on January 18–20, 2008. The event featured local players from India, Pakistan and the West Indies. The first international tournament hosted was another Twenty20 tournament, the MAQ T20 International Cricket Tournament, on May 23–25, 2008. That event featured teams from Canada, Pakistan, the West Indies, and the rest of the world, including former superstars such as Javed Miandad, Richie Richardson, and Mohammed Azharuddin.[3]

The park hosted the first top-tier international cricket competition on American soil, a two-match Twenty20 series between New Zealand and Sri Lanka, from May 22, 2010.[4] The series was drawn 1-1, and despite it being a low-scoring affair, the healthy and supportive crowd, as well as the fine-quality facilities (allowing for the exception of substandard lighting, which resulted in the cancellation of an originally scheduled night match), gave promise of more international cricket being played at the park's stadium in the future.[5]

However in April 2013 the mayor of Lauderhill, Richard J Kaplan, sent a letter to the International Cricket Council chief executive Dave Richardson, stating that the council was looking at redeveloping the cricket stadium into a multi-sports facility, due to the lack of income and marquee events that have recently been held at the Field.[6]

The Main Event Field was the home of the Fort Lauderdale Fighting Squids of the United States Australian Football League in 2008. It also hosted the United States national rugby union team's home leg in their 2011 Rugby World Cup qualifier against Uruguay on November 21, 2009. The USA, already with a win in Uruguay in the first leg, secured its place in New Zealand with a 27–6 win.

The Main Event Field will host Fort Lauderdale Schulz Academy, a soccer team in the USL Premier Development League, in 2010.

The Fort Lauderdale Barracudas of the Stars Football League played their three home games at the park during the 2012 season. The league will play all of its games at the stadium for the 2013 season.

Other amenities[edit]

Central Broward Regional Park and Stadium also has two large artificial-turf practice fields. They can be split into four American football or soccer pitches, or combined into two cricket pitches. It also features standard playgrounds, a 1.5-mile walking trail, and basketball, netball and tennis courts. A water park—Tropical Splash—opened in March 2008.[7]

The park is also home to the MLS combine, the future stars of Major League Soccer since its inception in 2011.

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 26°08′24″N 80°11′55″W / 26.139959°N 80.198689°W / 26.139959; -80.198689