Central Nova

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Central Nova
Flag of Nova Scotia.svg Nova Scotia electoral district
Central nova map.png
Central Nova in relation to the other Nova Scotia federal electoral districts
Federal electoral district
Legislature House of Commons
MP
 
 
 
Peter MacKay
Conservative
District created 1966
First contested 1968
Last contested 2011
District webpage profile, map
Demographics
Population (2011)[1] 72,114
Electors (2011) 58,863
Area (km²)[1] 7,720.82
Pop. density (per km²) 9.3
Census divisions Antigonish
Guysborough
Halifax
Pictou
Census subdivisions Halifax, New Glasgow, Stellarton, Antigonish, Pictou, Westville, Trenton, St. Mary's

Central Nova (French: Nova-Centre) is a federal electoral district in Nova Scotia, Canada, that has been represented in the House of Commons of Canada from 1968 to 1997 and since 2004. Its population in 2001 was 73,722.

From 1983 to 1984, the riding's then Member of Parliament, Brian Mulroney, was Leader of Her Majesty's Loyal Opposition. Mulroney was later Prime Minister while representing a riding in Quebec.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Year Pop.   ±%  
2001 74,445 —    
2006 72,966 −2.0%
2011 72,114 −1.2%

From the 2006 census[2]

Ethnic groups:

Languages:

Religions:

Education:

  • No certificate, diploma or degree: 28.9%
  • High school certificate: 22.2%
  • Apprenticeship or trade certificate or diploma: 13.2%
  • Community college, CEGEP or other non-university certificate or diploma: 20.0%
  • University certificate or diploma: 16.1%

Median Age:

  • 43.4

Median total income:

  • $20,994

Average total income:

  • $28,242

Median household income:

  • $43,851

Average household income:

  • $53,880

Median family income:

  • $54,013

Average family income:

  • $63,917

Unemployment:

  • 9.8%

Geography[edit]

The district covers all or part of the following counties:

Specifically, it includes the following municipal corporations:

Communities include:

Pictou County
Antigonish County
Guysborough County
Halifax County

The electoral district has an area of 8,439 km2.

Political geography[edit]

In 2008, the riding had the unusual scenario of having Green Party leader Elizabeth May run without any Liberal opposition. Thus, the race was mostly between Conservative candidate Peter McKay and May. May's support was concentrated in the community of Antigonish. Outside this area, she won just a few pockets of support. She was nearly shut out in the New Glasgow metropolitan area, where she won just one poll. McKay won most of the rest of the riding, and the NDP picked up three polls.[3]

History[edit]

The district was created in 1966 from Antigonish—Guysborough, Colchester—Hants, and Pictou. In 1966, it consisted of Pictou County, southern Colchester County, eastern Halifax County, and western Guysborough County. In 1976, it gained some territory in Halifax County (eastern central portion), and it lost its territory in Colchester County. In 1987, it lost most of Guysborough County except for the most extreme western point, and gained all of central and central western Halifax County. In 1996, it was merged into Pictou—Antigonish—Guysborough, and Sackville—Eastern Shore.

The electoral district was re-created in 2003: 93.3% of the riding came from Pictou—Antigonish—Guysborough riding, and 6.7% came from Sackville—Musquodoboit Valley—Eastern Shore. In the 2004 election, Conservative Party candidate Peter MacKay, who had represented Pictou—Antigonish—Guysborough, was returned to the House of Commons from Central Nova. He was re-elected in the 2006 election.

Green Party leader Elizabeth May contested the seat in the 2008 federal election. In a move that startled political observers, Liberal leader Stéphane Dion announced on April 13, 2007, that his party would not contest the seat in order to give May a better chance of winning, a move that marked the first time in decades that the Liberals did not field a full slate of candidates in a general election. In return, the Greens (who also fielded a full slate in the last election) did not contest Dion's Montreal riding. After coming in second to Peter MacKay, May announced she would not run in Central Nova in the next federal election.

Its new boundaries, determined during 2012 federal electoral boundaries redistribution, are slated to be legally defined in the 2013 representation order. It will encompass most of the current riding as well as a portion of Nova Scotia represented in the current electoral district of Sackville—Eastern Shore.[4] It is likely to come into effect upon the call of the 42nd Canadian federal election, scheduled for October 2015, although in the unlikely event an election is called prior to April 2014, the current electoral boundaries would remain in effect.[5]

Members of Parliament[edit]

This riding has elected the following Members of Parliament:

Parliament Years Member Party
Central Nova
Riding created from Antigonish—Guysborough,
Colchester—Hants and Pictou
28th  1968 − 1971     Russell MacEwan Progressive Conservative
 1971 − 1972     Elmer MacKay Progressive Conservative
29th  1972 − 1974
30th  1974 − 1979
31st  1979 − 1980
32nd  1980 − 1983
 1983 − 1984     Brian Mulroney Progressive Conservative
33rd  1984 − 1988     Elmer MacKay Progressive Conservative
34th  1988 − 1993
35th  1993 − 1997     Roseanne Skoke Liberal
Riding dissolved into Pictou—Antigonish—Guysborough
and Sackville—Eastern Shore
Riding re-created from Pictou—Antigonish—Guysborough
and Sackville—Musquodoboit Valley—Eastern Shore
38th  2004 − 2006     Peter MacKay Conservative
39th  2006 − 2008
40th  2008 − 2011
41st  2011 − Present

Election results[edit]

2004 – present[edit]

Canadian federal election, 2011
Party Candidate Votes % ∆% Expenditures
Conservative Peter MacKay 21,593 56.79 +10.19
New Democratic David Parker 9,412 24.75 +5.19
Liberal John Hamilton 5,614 14.76
Green Matthew Chisholm 1,406 3.70 -28.54
Total valid votes/Expense limit 38,025 100.00  
Total rejected ballots 226 0.59 -0.18
Turnout 38,251 66.18
Eligible voters 57,797
Canadian federal election, 2008
Party Candidate Votes % ∆% Expenditures
Conservative Peter MacKay 18,240 46.60 +5.94 $60,795
Green Elizabeth May 12,620 32.24 +30.65 $55,482
New Democratic Louise Lorifice 7,659 19.56 -13.33
Christian Heritage Michael Harris MacKay 427 1.09
Canadian Action Paul Kemp 196 0.50 $75
Total valid votes 39,142 100.00  
Total rejected ballots 304 0.77
Turnout 39,446
     Conservative hold Swing -12.4
Canadian federal election, 2006
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Conservative Peter MacKay 17,134 40.66 -2.61
New Democratic Alexis MacDonald 13,861 32.89 +5.23
Liberal Dan Walsh 10,349 24.56 -1.83
Green David Orton 671 1.59 -1.09
Marxist–Leninist Allan H. Bezanson 124 0.29
Total valid votes 12,135 100.00
     Conservative hold Swing -3.92
Canadian federal election, 2004
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Conservative Peter MacKay 16,376 43.27 -12.13
New Democratic Alexis MacDonald 10,470 27.66 +14.84
Liberal Susan Green 9,986 26.39 -3.95
Green Rebecca Mosher 1,015 2.68
Total valid votes 37,847 100.00
     Conservative notional hold Swing -13.5

Change from 2000 is based on redistributed results. Conservative Party change is based on the combination of Canadian Alliance and Progressive Conservative Party totals.

1968 – 1997[edit]

Canadian federal election, 1993
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Liberal Roseanne Skoke 16,399 43.61 +5.22
Progressive Conservative Ken Streatch 11,916 31.69 -16.89
Reform Howard Mackinnon 6,068 16.14
New Democratic Hugh Mackenzie 2,446 6.50 -6.52
National Gerard W. Horgan 511 1.36  
Natural Law Pulkesh Lakhanpal 266 0.71  
Total valid votes 37,606 100.00
Canadian federal election, 1988
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Progressive Conservative Elmer MacKay 19,065 48.58 -12.42
Liberal Marion Anderson 15,066 38.39 +12.39
New Democratic Gloria Murphy 5,110 13.02 +0.02
Total valid votes 39,241 100.00
Canadian federal election, 1984
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Progressive Conservative Elmer MacKay 21,462 61.00 +0.81
Liberal Al Lomas 9,148 26.00 +0.95
New Democratic Gloria E. Murphy 4,572 13.00 -0.39
Total valid votes 35,182 100.00
Canadian federal by-election, 29 August 1983
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Due to the resignation Elmer MacKay on 15 June 1983
Progressive Conservative Brian Mulroney 18,882 60.19 +12.16
Liberal Alvin Sinclair 7,858 25.05 -9.21
New Democratic Roy G. Demarsh 4,202 13.39 -4.32
Independent Anne McBride 287 0.91
Independent Bob Robert Kirk 97 0.31
Independent John Turmel 46 0.15
Total valid votes 31,372 100.00
Canadian federal election, 1980
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Progressive Conservative Elmer MacKay 15,576 48.03 -8.55
Liberal Alvin Sinclair 11,111 34.26 +4.37
New Democratic Gary A. Chambers 5,743 17.71 +4.18
Total valid votes 32,430 100.00
Canadian federal election, 1979
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Progressive Conservative Elmer MacKay 18,907 56.58 +2.65
Liberal Lloyd P. Mackay 9,988 29.89 -6.41
New Democratic Gary A. Chambers 4,521 13.53 +4.67
Total valid votes 33,416 100.00
Canadian federal election, 1974
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Progressive Conservative Elmer MacKay 17,459 53.93 -3.02
Liberal Fern Dunn 11,753 36.30 +7.33
New Democratic John Rod Brown 2,869 8.86 -3.98
Social Credit John J. Henderson 292 0.90 -0.34
Total valid votes 32,373 100.00
Canadian federal election, 1972
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Progressive Conservative Elmer MacKay 18,259 56.95 +4.37
Liberal D. Laurence Mawhinney 9,288 28.97 -9.37
New Democratic John Rod Brown 4,117 12.84 +6.20
Social Credit John J. Henderson 397 1.24 -1.20
Total valid votes 32,061 100.00
Canadian federal by-election, 31 May 1971
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Due to the resignation of Russell MacEwan on 14 January 1971
Progressive Conservative Elmer MacKay 15,359 52.58 -5.99
Liberal Clarrie Mackinnon 11,200 38.34 +5.07
New Democratic Allan M. Marchbank 1,940 6.64 -1.52
Social Credit John J. Henderson 714 2.44
Total valid votes 29,213 100.00
Canadian federal election, 1968
Party Candidate Votes %
Progressive Conservative Russell MacEwan 16,720 58.57
Liberal Donald F. Stewart 9,499 33.27
New Democratic Leo F. McKay 2,330 8.16
Total valid votes 28,549 100.00

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

External links[edit]