Centrosaurinae

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Centrosaurines
Temporal range: Late Cretaceous, 77–66Ma
CeratopsianII BW.jpg
Various species of centrosaurines
Scientific classification e
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Clade: Dinosauria
Order: Ornithischia
Family: Ceratopsidae
Subfamily: Centrosaurinae
Lambe, 1915
Type species
Centrosaurus apertus
Lambe, 1904
Synonyms
  • Pachyrhinosaurinae Sternberg, 1950

The Centrosaurinae is a subfamily of ceratopsid dinosaurs named by paleontologist Lawrence Lambe, in 1915, with Centrosaurus as the type genus. The centrosaurines are further divided into two tribes, the centrosaurins and the pachyrhinosaurins.[1]

Classification[edit]

The cladogram presented here follows a 2012 phylogenetic analysis by Ryan, Evans & Shepherd.[2] Clade names within Centrosaurinae follow Fiorillo & Tykoski (2012).[3]

Ceratopsidae 

Chasmosaurinae


 Centrosaurinae 

Xenoceratops foremostensis




Diabloceratops eatoni




Avaceratops lammersi




Albertaceratops nesmoi





Spinops sternbergorum




Centrosaurus apertus




Coronosaurus brinkmani



Styracosaurus albertensis





Pachyrhinosaurini

Sinoceratops zhuchengensis




Rubeosaurus ovatus




Einiosaurus procurvicornis


 Pachyrostra 

Achelousaurus horneri




Pachyrhinosaurus canadensis



Pachyrhinosaurus lakustai













This cladogram follows the phylogenetic analysis performed by Sampson et al. (2013). As is the case above, clade names within Centrosaurinae follow Fiorillo & Tykoski (2012).[3]

Ceratopsidae 

Chasmosaurinae


 Centrosaurinae 

Diabloceratops eatoni





Avaceratops lammersi



Nasutoceratops titusi





Albertaceratops nesmoi






Rubeosaurus ovatus



Styracosaurus albertensis





Spinops sternbergorum




Centrosaurus apertus



Coronosaurus brinkmani





Pachyrhinosaurini


Xenoceratops foremostensis



Sinoceratops zhuchengensis





Einiosaurus procurvicornis


 Pachyrostra 

Achelousaurus horneri




Pachyrhinosaurus canadensis




Pachyrhinosaurus lakustai



Pachyrhinosaurus perotorum












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Reproduction[edit]

Hypothesised ontogenic development of Pachyrhinosaurus perotorum

Possible neonate sized centrosaurine fossils have been documented in the scientific literature.[4] Research indicates that centrosaurines did not achieve fully developed mating signals until nearly fully grown.[5] Scott D. Sampson finds commonality between the slow growth of mating signals in centrosaurines and the extended adolescence of animals whose social structures are ranked hierarchies founded on age-related differences.[5] In these sorts of groups young males are typically sexually mature for several years before actually beginning to breed, when their mating signals are most fully developed.[6] Females, by contrast do not have such an extended adolescence.[6]-265" />

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ Sampson (1995).
  2. ^ Ryan, M. J.; Evans, D. C.; Shepherd, K. M.; Sues, H. (2012). "A new ceratopsid from the Foremost Formation (middle Campanian) of Alberta". Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences 49 (10): 1251. doi:10.1139/e2012-056.  edit
  3. ^ a b Fiorillo, A. R.; Tykoski, R. S. (2012). "A new Maastrichtian species of the centrosaurine ceratopsid Pachyrhinosaurus from the North Slope of Alaska". Acta Palaeontologica Polonica 57 (3): 561. doi:10.4202/app.2011.0033.  edit
  4. ^ "Abstract," Tanke and Brett-Surman (2001). Page 207.
  5. ^ a b "Retarded Growth of Mating Signals," Sampson (2001); page 270.
  6. ^ a b "Sociological Correlates in Extant Vertebrates," Sampson (2001); page 265.

References[edit]

  • Sampson, S. D. (1995b). "Two new horned dinosaurs from the Upper Cretaceous Two Medicine Formation of Montana; with a phylogenetic analysis of the Centrosaurinae (Ornithischia: Ceratopsidae)." Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 15(4): 743-760.
  • Sampson, S. D., 2001, Speculations on the socioecology of Ceratopsid dinosaurs (Orinthischia: Neoceratopsia): In: Mesozoic Vertebrate Life, edited by Tanke, D. H., and Carpenter, K., Indiana University Press, pp. 263–276.
  • Tanke, D.H. and Brett-Surman, M.K. 2001. Evidence of Hatchling and Nestling-Size Hadrosaurs (Reptilia:Ornithischia) from Dinosaur Provincial Park (Dinosaur Park Formation: Campanian), Alberta, Canada. pp. 206–218. In: Mesozoic Vertebrate Life—New Research Inspired by the Paleontology of Philip J. Currie. Edited by D.H. Tanke and K. Carpenter. Indiana University Press: Bloomington. xviii + 577 pp.

External links[edit]