Certified Technicians and Technologists Association of Manitoba

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Certified Technicians and Technologists Association of Manitoba
CTTAM Logo.jpg
Founded 1965
Focus Certification of engineering technicians and technologists
Location
Area served Manitoba
Method National Technology Benchmarks
Members 2510
Key people Grant Nicol CET, Current President
Website www.cttam.com
member of Canadian Council of Technicians and Technologists

The Certified Technicians and Technologists Association of Manitoba (CTTAM) is Manitoba's independent certifying body for engineering/applied science technicians and technologists.

CTTAM confers the post-nominal designations of C.Tech. (Certified Technician), C.E.T. (Certified Engineering Technologist), and A.Sc.T. (Applied Science Technologist) which are symbols of achievement in engineering/applied science technology and are legally protected for use only by fully certified members in good standing. The designations are recognized across Canada by many employers and other engineering professionals through the efforts of provincial associations that make up the Canadian Council of Technicians and Technologists (CCTT). Though CCTT being a signatory, the Certified Engineering Technicians and Technologists Association of Manitoba recognizes international transferability through the Sydney Accord, the Dublin Accord and the Engineering Technology Mobility Forum, which confers the ability to award the designation IntET(Canada) for Technnologists who wish to work internationally.

The Certified Technicians and Technologists Association of Manitoba, under the name Manitoba Certified Technicians and Technologists (MANCETT), was established in 1965.

Certified Engineering Technologists are bound by a specific code of ethics and rules of professional conduct.[1]

The association is mandated and empowered by the Certified Applied Science Technologists Act of Manitoba[2]

Although certification is voluntary, some employers will require it.[3]

M-License[edit]

In 2006, the legislation regarding electrical work changed. Now, all electrical workers must be licensed.

Certified members in the field of Electrical, Instrumentation, Electronic, Communication, Computer, Biomedical and Mechanical can be granted a M-license limited license to practice electrical work, once certain criteria are met.[4]

There are 3 levels of license available: A limited construction license which can be attained after 5400 hours of documented construction work, a maintenance license which can be attained after 3400 hours of documented maintenance work, and a maintenance/builder license.[5]

Activism & Lobbying[edit]

CTTAM is actively involved with lobbying for the interests of technologists in Manitoba.

CTTAM, in cooperation with the Association of consulting Engineering companies (ACEC), The Manitoba Association of Architects (MAA) and representatives from the insurance industry, is lobbying to reduce the ultimate limitation period for civil actions in Manitoba.[6]

CTTAM has contributed to local community colleges, including Red River College[7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.cttam.com/site/pinterest?nav=home
  2. ^ http://web2.gov.mb.ca/laws/statutes/ccsm/c045-1e.php THE CERTIFIED APPLIED SCIENCE TECHNOLOGISTS ACT of manitoba.
  3. ^ http://www.cirl.org/documents/en/engineering_technologist_manitoba.html Occupation: Engineering Technologist
  4. ^ http://www.cttam.com/site/licence?nav=02 M-License
  5. ^ http://www.axonautomation.ca/m_licence.html ELECTRICAL LICENSING FOR INSTRUMENTATION
  6. ^ http://acec-mb.ca/about Association of consulting Engineering companies (ACEC)
  7. ^ https://www.rrc.ca/files/file/development/2012AnnualDonorReport.pdf Red River College donor report

External links[edit]