Cerulean

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For other uses, see Cerulean (disambiguation).
CeruleanHow to read this color infobox
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet #007BA7
sRGBB  (rgb) (0, 123, 167)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k) (100, 26, 0, 35)
HSV       (h, s, v) (196°, 100%, 65%)
Source Maerz and Paul[1]
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)
Cerulean (RGB)How to read this color infobox
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet #003FFF
sRGBB  (rgb) (0, 63, 255)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k) (100, 75, 0, 0)
HSV       (h, s, v) (225°, 100%, 100%)
Source [Unsourced]
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

Cerulean (/səˈrliən/), also spelled caerulean, is a color term that may be applied to certain colors with the hue ranging roughly between blue and cyan, overlapping with both. It also largely overlaps with azure and sky blue, although cerulean is dimmer.

The first recorded use of cerulean as a color name in English was in 1590.[2] The word is derived from the Latin word caeruleus, "dark blue, blue or blue-green", which in turn probably derives from caelulum, diminutive of caelum, "heaven, sky".[3]

Use in artistic painting[edit]

Cerulean blue PB35
A sample swatch of cerulean blue hue oil paint. 'Hue' in this case means that other pigments have been used to mimic the hue of oil paint containing the original pigment.

In classical times, cerulean was used to describe blue pigments, particularly mixtures of copper and cobaltous oxides. These early attempts to create sky blue colors were often less than satisfactory due to greenish hues and lack of permanence. When the pigment cerulean blue (shown in the color box to the left) was invented, it largely superseded all these prior pigments. See also Tekhelet.

Cerulean blue[edit]

Cerulean BlueHow to read this color infobox
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet #2A52BE
sRGBB  (rgb) (42, 82, 190)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k) (87, 74, 0, 0)
HSV       (h, s, v) (224°, 78%, 75%)
Source [4]
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

At right is displayed the color cerulean blue.

The first recorded use of cerulean blue as a color name in English was in 1859.[5]

Pigments through the ages shows a "Painted swatch of cerulean blue" that is representative of the actual cobalt stannate pigment. This color swatch matches the color shown in the color box at right.[6]

Cerulean blue pigment[edit]

Discovered in 1805 by Andreas Höpfner, the pigment originally referred to as cerulean blue (or corruleum blue) was first marketed in 1860 as "coeruleum" by George Rowney of the United Kingdom. The primary chemical constituent of the pigment is cobalt(II) stannate.[7][8][9]

It is particularly valuable for artistic painting of skies because of the purity of the blue (specifically the lack of greenish hues), its permanence (no other blue pigments retained color as well), and its opaqueness.[10]

Today, cobalt chromate is sometimes marketed under the cerulean blue name but is darker and greener (Rex Art color index PB 36) than the cobalt stannate version (color index PB 35). The chromate makes excellent turquoise colors and is identified by Rex Art and some other manufacturers as "cobalt turquoise".[11][12]

Other variations of cerulean[edit]

Pale cerulean[edit]

Cerulean (Pantone)How to read this color infobox
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet #98B4D4
sRGBB  (rgb) (152, 180, 212)
HSV       (h, s, v) (212°, 28%, 83%)
Source Pantone TPX[13]
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)

Pantone, in a press release, declared the pale tone of cerulean at right, which they call cerulean, as the "color of the millennium".[14]

The source of this color is the "Pantone Textile Paper eXtended (TPX)" color list, color #15-4020 TPX—Cerulean.[15]

Bright cerulean[edit]

Cerulean (Crayola)How to read this color infobox
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet #1DACD6
sRGBB  (rgb) (29, 172, 214)
HSV       (h, s, v) (209°, 94%, 49%)
Source Crayola
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)

This bright tone of cerulean is the color called cerulean by Crayola crayons.

Cerulean frost[edit]

Cerulean FrostHow to read this color infobox
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet #6D9BC3
sRGBB  (rgb) (109, 155, 195)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k) (44, 21, 0, 24)
HSV       (h, s, v) (208°, 44%, 77[16]%)
Source Crayola
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

At right is displayed the color cerulean frost.

Cerulean frost is one of the colors in the special set of metallic colored Crayola crayons called Silver Swirls, the colors of which were formulated by Crayola in 1990.

Cerulean in nature[edit]

Cerulean in human culture[edit]

Color
  • Cerulean was nominated by Pantone in 1999 as the "color of the millennium".[17] (See the color pale cerulean above)
Computer software
Film
Literature
Music
  • Cerulean is the album title for the September 10, 1991 music release by the band The Ocean Blue.
  • Cerulean is the first album by musician Baths
  • Cerulean is the sixth track on the 1992 album Hoodoo Zephyr by composer John Adams.
  • Cerulean is a song of the Simian Mobile Disco band, recorded on "Unpatterns" album.
  • Cerulean is a track of Jon Hopkins, recorded on his album entitled "Opalescent".
Science
Television
  • Repetition of the words "cerulean blue" is a method the "Pusher" villain uses at the beginning of the eponymous X-Files episode 17 season 3 in order to lull his victims to do what he wants.
  • In the fourth season Rocky and Bullwinkle story arc Painting Theft, villain Boris Badenov adopts the guise of a fictitious art collector named "Cerulean Blue."
Video games

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ In the book by Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color (1930), the color Cerulean is displayed on Page 89 Color Plate 33 Color Sample E6.
  2. ^ Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York:1930 McGraw-Hill Page 190; Color Sample of Cerulean: Page 89 Plate 33 Color Sample E6
  3. ^ Cerulean, Online Etymology Dictionary
  4. ^ The color displayed in the color box above matches the color called cerulean blue in the 1930 book by Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York:1930 McGraw-Hill; the color cerulean blue is displayed on page 89, Plate 33, Color Sample L9.
  5. ^ Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York:1930 McGraw-Hill Page 192; Color Sample of Cerulean Blue: Page 89 Plate 33 Color Sample L9
  6. ^ "Cerulean blue". Pigments through the Ages. Retrieved 30 December 2011. 
  7. ^ Cerulean blue (overview), Pigments of the Ages, Webexhibits.org
  8. ^ History of Cerulean blue, Pigments of the Ages, Webexhibits.org
  9. ^ Material Name: cerulean blue, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
  10. ^ Pigments: Historical, Chemical, and Artistic Importance of Coloring Agents, JcSparks.com
  11. ^ Blue Artist's Pigments, PaintMaking.com
  12. ^ blue watercolors, handprint.com (this is a cross-reference of colors grouped by color index)
  13. ^ Type the word "Cerulean" into the indicated window on the Pantone Color Finder and the color will appear.
  14. ^ "Pantone press release (1999)--Cerulean blue: the color of the New Millennium":
  15. ^ Pantone TPX Pantone Color Finder--Type the word "Cerulean" into the indicated window on the Pantone Color Finder and the color will appear:
  16. ^ web.forrett.com Color Conversion Tool set to hex code #6D9BC3 (Cerulean Frost):
  17. ^ Slate
  18. ^ spiritanimals.schoolastic.com

External links[edit]