Cervical part of internal carotid artery

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Artery: Cervical portion
Latin pars cervicalis arteriae carotidis internae
Gray's p.567

The Cervical portion (or cervical segment) of the internal carotid begins at the bifurcation of the common carotid, opposite the upper border of the thyroid cartilage, and runs perpendicularly upward, in front of the transverse processes of the upper three cervical vertebræ, to the carotid canal in the petrous portion of the temporal bone.

It is comparatively superficial at its commencement, where it is contained in the carotid triangle, and lies behind and lateral to the external carotid, overlapped by the Sternocleidomastoideus, and covered by the deep fascia, Platysma, and integument: it then passes beneath the parotid gland, being crossed by the hypoglossal nerve, the Digastricus and Stylohyoideus, and the occipital and posterior auricular arteries.

Higher up, it is separated from the external carotid by the Styloglossus and Stylopharyngeus, the tip of the temporal styloid process and the stylohyoid ligament, the glossopharyngeal nerve and the pharyngeal branch of the vagus.

It is in relation, behind, with the Longus capitis, the superior cervical ganglion of the sympathetic trunk, and the superior laryngeal nerve; laterally, with the internal jugular vein and vagus nerve, the nerve lying on a plane posterior to the artery; medially, with the pharynx, superior laryngeal nerve, and ascending pharyngeal artery.

At the base of the skull the glossopharyngeal, vagus, accessory, and hypoglossal nerves lie between the artery and the internal jugular vein.

References[edit]

This article incorporates text from a public domain edition of Gray's Anatomy.