Chūgū-ji

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Chūgū-ji Hondō

Chūgū-ji (中宮寺?) is a temple in Nara Prefecture, Japan, that was founded as a nunnery in the seventh century by Shōtoku Taishi. Located immediately to the northeast of Hōryū-ji, its statue of Miroku and Tenjukoku mandala are National Treasures.

History[edit]

Chūgūji was once the palace of Hashihito, mother of Shōtoku Taishi. After her death it was converted into a temple. Originally standing three hundred metres to the east, it was moved to its present location in the Muromachi period.[1] Chūgū-ji is one of three nunneries in Yamato whose chief priestesses were imperial princesses.[2] The site of Chūgū-ji has been designated a Historic Site, and the Edo period Omotegomon has been registered as a cultural property.[3][4]

Miroku Bosatsu[edit]

The camphor wood statue of Miroku (菩薩半跏像?) is a National Treasure dating from the Asuka period. Formerly painted, it is finished in lacquer.[1][5][6][7]

Tenjukoku Shūchō Mandala[edit]

After the death of Shōtoku Taishi in 622, his consort Tachibana-no-Oiratsume commissioned the Tenjukoku Shūchō Mandala (天寿国繍帳?). The embroidery of heaven and eternal life, together with one hundred tortoises and accompanying text, was restored in the Edo period by combining the surviving fragments with parts of a Kamakura period replica.[8][9]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Mizuno, Seiichi (1974). Asuka Buddhist Art: Horyuji. Weatherhill. pp. 78ff. 
  2. ^ "Chuguji Temple". Ikugara. Retrieved 19 March 2011. 
  3. ^ "Database of Registered National Cultural Properties". Agency for Cultural Affairs. Retrieved 19 March 2011. 
  4. ^ "Database of Registered National Cultural Properties". Agency for Cultural Affairs. Retrieved 19 March 2011. 
  5. ^ "Chuguji Temple". Nara Prefecture. Retrieved 19 March 2011. 
  6. ^ Moran, S. F. (1958). "The Statue of Miroku Bosatsu of Chuguji". Artibus Asiae 21 (3/4): 179–203. JSTOR 3248882. 
  7. ^ "Database of Registered National Cultural Properties". Agency for Cultural Affairs. Retrieved 19 March 2011. 
  8. ^ Mizuno, Seiichi (1974). Asuka Buddhist Art: Horyuji. Weatherhill. p. 52. 
  9. ^ "The Tenjukoku Shucho Mandara". Tokyo National Museum. Retrieved 19 March 2011. 

External links[edit]

(Japanese) Chūgūji homepage

Coordinates: 34°36′54″N 135°44′22″E / 34.61500°N 135.73944°E / 34.61500; 135.73944