Chaco (footwear)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Chaco is a brand of footwear known for its product line of Z strap sandals, usually referred to as Chacos. The sandals were originally intended for use by whitewater rafting guides.[1] In 2009, the brand was acquired by Wolverine World Wide,[2][3] the company that also owns Sperry Top-Sider, Merrell, and a variety of other footwear brands including the exclusive license to manufacture Patagonia footwear. Under the Chaco brand there are a variety of shoes and sandals as well as other products geared towards fans of the sandals.

Products[edit]

Z Strap Sandals[edit]

The main strap of Chacos run in a Z shape across the right foot when viewed from the top, hence the product name 'Z'.

Chaco Z/1 Sandals without a toe loop. Notice the Z shape on the right foot.

The Z/2 sandals have a toe loop. The ZX sandals have two narrower straps rather than one wide strap and are currently only available in women's models. Chacos are available with various soles listed below:

Colorado[edit]

The Colorado is the original Chaco sole and named after the river which inspired it. It is currently only available when ordering a custom sandal or when re-soling sandals through the ReChaco service.[4] This sole is thinner and flatter than the later Unaweep and Terreno varieties. This shape affords it better traction on slippery surfaces. It is a non-marking sole developed and manufactured by Vibram using the rubber compound TC-1.

Terreno[edit]

This sole was developed for durable use on loose and dry terrain (hence its name). It is currently only available when ordering a custom sandal or when re-soling sandals through the ReChaco service.[4] While it can be worn in the water it was developed for its durability as wearers of the original sandal used them in areas beyond whitewater rafting. It is a non-marking sole developed and manufactured by Vibram using the rubber compound TC-1.

Unaweep[edit]

Named after a canyon in Colorado, this is currently the standard sole on Z strap sandals. It was developed as a compromise between the earlier two soles. It is a non-marking sole developed and manufactured by Vibram using the rubber compound TC-1.[5]

Diamond Stealth (Discontinued)[edit]

Named after the diamond pattern on the sole, these are considered by many to be the highest traction Chaco soles ever produced. It is a marking sole developed by Stone Age Equipment, Inc., the owner of Five Ten Footwear using the Stealth rubber compound.

Pro[edit]

Developed as a response to the discontinued Diamond Stealth sole, the Pro sole gets its name as a nod to its intended use by whitewater professionals. It has better wet traction than all other soles currently available. It is a marking sole developed and manufactured by Vibram using the rubber compound GM (also known by its trade name "Idrogrip").[5]

Yampa[edit]

Yampa is a light use sole and its name is a reference to the calmwater floating trips[6] that people take on the Yampa River. This sole is sold in several colors. It is a non-marking sole developed and manufactured by Vibram using the rubber compound TC-1.[5]

Others[edit]

Many other soles both proprietary and Vibram standard soles are used in lower performance sandals and shoes. For example, the EcoTread is a sole developed and manufactured by Chaco using a portion of recycled rubber. In the "Rex" model, EcoTread is available with sipes.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Chaco". Our Brands. Wolverine World Wide. 2013. Retrieved 17 August 2013. 
  2. ^ "Wolverine World Wide Acquires Chaco Footwear". Associated Press. 22 January 2009. Retrieved 17 August 2013. 
  3. ^ Cowdin, Christi (22 January 2009). "Wolverine World Wide, Inc. Announces Acquisition of the Chaco Footwear Brand". Reuters. Retrieved 17 August 2013. 
  4. ^ a b "Resoling? Select Your Outsole". Chaco USA. Retrieved 17 August 2013. 
  5. ^ a b c "What's Your Sole?". Chaco Blog. Chaco UK. 12 June 2011. Retrieved 17 August 2013. 
  6. ^ "Yampa River". Whitewater Rafting Guide to River Trips. Rafting.com. Retrieved 17 August 2013. 

External links[edit]