Chain of events

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A chain of events is a number of actions and their effects that are contiguous and linked together.

Determinism[edit]

Determinism is the philosophical proposition that every event, including human cognition and behaviour, decision and action, is causally determined by an unbroken chain of events.[1] With numerous historical debates, many varieties and philosophical positions on the subject of determinism exist from traditions throughout the world.

In value theory[edit]

In value theory, it is the amount of cause and effects of the chain of events before generating intrinsic value that separates high and low grades of instrumental value. The chain of events duration is the time it takes to reach the terminal event. In value theory this is generally the intrinsic value (also called terminal value). It is contrasted with ethic value duration, which is the time that an object has any value intensity.

Fabric of events[edit]

A fabric of events is an expansion of the chain of events, emphasizing that chains of events are intertwined with each other, as a fabric.[citation needed]

In aviation[edit]

In aviation, a chain of events, often called an error chain, is the combination of many contributing factors that typically lead to an accident, rather than one single event.[2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Van Inwagen, Peter, 1983, An Essay on Free Will, Oxford: Clarendon Press.
  2. ^ Willits, Pat. Guided Flight Discovery: Private Pilot. Mike Abbott and Liz Kailey. Englewood: Jeppesen. pp. 10–26. ISBN 0-88487-429-X. OCLC 145504766. Retrieved August 2007.