Chandoli National Park

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Chandoli National Park
Sahyadri Tiger Reserve
IUCN category II (national park)
Oriental Garden Lizard or Bloodsucker.jpg
Oriental Garden Lizard at Chandoli National Park
Map showing the location of Chandoli National Park
Map showing the location of Chandoli National Park
Location Sangli District, Shirala tahsil, Maharashtra, India
Nearest city Sangli, shirala
Coordinates 17°11′30″N 73°46′30″E / 17.19167°N 73.77500°E / 17.19167; 73.77500Coordinates: 17°11′30″N 73°46′30″E / 17.19167°N 73.77500°E / 17.19167; 73.77500
Area 317.67 square kilometres (122.65 sq mi)
Established May 2004
Governing body Maharashtra State Forest Dept.
Website mahaforest.nic.in

Chandoli National Park (Hindi: चांदोली राष्ट्रीय उद्यान)[1] is an 317.67 km2 (122.65 sq mi) National Park in Sangli District Maharashtra state, India, established in May 2004,[2] Earlier it was a Wildlife Sanctuary declared in 1985.

Chandoli Park is notable as the southern portion of the Sahyadri Tiger Reserve, with Koyna Wildlife Sanctuary forming the northern part of the reserve.

Sahyadri Tiger Reserve[edit]

The 741.22 km2 (286.19 sq mi) Sahyadri Tiger Reserve, including all of Chandoli National Park and Koyna Wildlife Sanctuary was declared by The National Tiger Conservation Authority as a Project Tiger tiger reserve on May 21, 2007. The Sahyadri Tiger Reserve was then estimated to have nine tigers and 66 leopards.[3]

Location[edit]

Chandoli National Park is located near the Chandoli Dam between longitudes 73°40' and 73°53' E and latitudes 17°03' and 17°20'N near Sangli in Western Maharashtra. It is located at the junction of Sangli District, Kolhapur District, Satara District and Ratnagiri District. It lies between the Koyna Wildlife Sanctuary and Radhanagri Wildlife Sanctuary and forms the southern part of the Sahyadri Tiger Reserve.

History[edit]

According to legend, goddess Bhavani gave a divine sword to Shivaji.

The historical places of the park include the 17th century Shivaji's Forts, Prachitgad and Bhairavgad, of the Maratha kings Shivaji Maharaj and his son Sambhaji Maharaj. Ruins of the Bhavani temples palatial buildings in Prachitigad and Kalavantin vihir depict the ancient glory of the Maratha Empire. Most of the protected area was used an open jail for the "prisoners of war" of the early Imperial Maratha Conquests during Shivaji Maharaj's rule. Sambhaji Maharaj used Prachitgad as an observation point and recreational place.[4]

Geography[edit]

The park spreads along the crest of the Sahyadri Range of the northern Western Ghats. It forms and protects many perennial water channels, water holes and the Vasant Sagar Reservoir. Elevation of the park ranges from 589–1,044 m (1,932–3,425 ft). .[5] The park receives its water supply from the Warna river and reservoir as well as several other small streams and rivers.

Flat topped mountains, rocky, lateritic plateaus called 'Saddas', almost devoid of vegetation, large boulders and caves are distinctive to the protected areas in the Sahyadri region of the Western Ghats.

Flora[edit]

The forest types seen here are a mix of Malabar Coast moist forests and North Western Ghats moist deciduous forests. In the dwarf evergreen forests, some tree species commonly seen here are the anjani ironwood tree, jamun, pisa (angustifolia), fig, Olea (diocia), katak spinous kino tree, nana or Crape myrtle (lanceolata), kinjal, kokum tree and phanasi false kelat (brachiata). Other trees dominating the landscape include asan wood or ain or Indian laurel, amla or Indian gooseberry, umbar or devil fig (hispida) and harra or chebulic myrobalan.

Grasses commonly seen here include bangala or bluestem grass sp., dongari or golden beard grass (fulvus), black spear grass, kalikusli or tangle grass, anjan grass or buffel grass, grader grass or karad or kangaroo grass (quadrivalvis) and grasses belonging to Poaceae family, like saphet-kusli or Aristida funiculata. Insectivorous plant species like sundews and bladderworts sp. are also found in this protected area.

Fauna[edit]

Nearly 23 species of mammals, 122 species of birds, 20 species of amphibians and reptiles are known to be resident in the forests of Chandoli.

Bengal Tigers, Indian leopards, Indian bison, leopard cats, sloth bears and Indian giant squirrels are quite conspicuous here.

Many prey species of ungulates such as barking deer, sambar deer, mouse deer and blackbuck are present. A census carried out in 2002 by the Forest Department showed a rise in the number of tigers, leopards, gaur, barking deer, mouse deer, sloth bears and blackbuck. A similar census carried out in 2004 showed a rise in gaur population in the Kolhapur Wildlife Division from 88 to 243. [6]

Development[edit]

Work undertaken for habitat improvement and development in the Chandoli National Park include removal of invasive species, soil conservation and water conservation, vaccination of cattle, research, fire prevention, providing salt licks, demarcation of boundary, erection of watch towers, maintenance of nature trails, desalting water holes, development of grasslands, and procurement of wireless two-way radios.[7]

Threats[edit]

The Maharashtra government has plans to set up the Karadi-Bhogiv hydro-electric project in the catchment area of the Warna Dam that is expected to use up 6.78 km2 (2.62 sq mi) of forest land. On a positive note, nearly 7,894 people and a significant cattle population resident on 84.29 km2 (32.54 sq mi) of land in 32 villages within the park. These villages have been successfully relocated to areas outside the park. This measure has helped to preserve and regenerate some of the vegetation in this protected area.[6]

Visitor Information[edit]

Scenic places like Kandhardoh and Kandhardoh Falls, Tanali falls and Vasant Sagar Reservoir are places of tourist importance in the park. Scenic points like Kokna darshan, Zolambi sada and the virgin forest of Rundiv add to the recreation value.

Best time to visit is October to February. June to September have heavy rainfall over 3,500 mm (140 in).

Distance to Chandoli

Sangmeshwar lies on the Mumbai-Goa Highway Islampur and Karad lie on the Mumbai-Banglore national highway NH4.

Sangli is 40 km (25 mi)from NH4 (Peth Naka).

Nearest Railway Stations

Miraj junction is well connected to important cities by express and superfast trains. You can alight at Miraj junction or Sangli railway stations and take a private car to Chandoli National Park.

By Road

You can reach Chandoli by taking National Highway NH4.

  • MSRTC Buses and private cars are available from Sangli and Miraj.
  • From Sangli/Miraj - Take Sangli Pune Road and cross Peth Naka without taking turn.
  • From Mumbai/Pune - Take right turn below Peth Naka flyover(Sangli district).
  • From Bangalore - Take left turn at Peth Naka(Sangli district).
Nearest Airports
  • Pune - 210 km (130 mi)
  • Mumbai - 380 km (240 mi)
  • Sangli New Airport (Kavathe Piran) is just 65 km (40 mi) from Chandoli and will be operational by 2014.
  • Kolhapur - 80 km (50 mi)(closed since 2011)
  • Karad - 55 km (34 mi)(Used for training purpose)
  • Sangli(Old Airport) - 65 km (40 mi)Closed for runway extension
Nearby Attractions
  • Sagreshwar Deer Park,Takari
  • Ramling Bet,Bahe
  • Narsinha Mandir-Underground 12 feet,Narsinhpur
  • Nath temple,32-Shirala
  • Old caves near 32 Shirala
  • Sambu-appa Temple,Urun Islampur
  • Tasgaon Ganesh temple, Tasgaon
  • Ganesh Temple, Sangli
  • Miraj Musical Instrument Industry
  • Sagareshwar Wild Life Sanctuary
  • Dandoba Wild Life Sanctuary
  • Krishna Valley Wine Park, Palus
  • Audumber Temple
  • Ramling Temple
  • Bijapur Historical Place
  • Kamatipura (mandur 1 km)

Accommodation can be reserved at the Irrigation Rest House, which has 4 suites, including 1 VIP suite and a dormitory for 16 persons, by contacting: Ex. Engineer, Irrigation Department at Mandur, Kolhapur, Maharashtra, 416 002

Administrator of the park is: Deputy Conservator of Forests/Wildlife, Bindu chowk, Ganji Galli, Kolhapur, Maharashtra, 416 002 Phone: 00-91-231-2542766[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ loksatta.com
  2. ^ "Times of India". The Times Of India. 2004-12-22. Retrieved 2006-09-27. 
  3. ^


    "Sahyadri is now a tiger reserve". Daily News and Analysis. May 28, 2008. Retrieved 2008-08-05. 

  4. ^ a b "Chandoli Wildlife Sanctuary, Kolhapur". Maharashtra State Forest Dept. Retrieved 2008-08-07. 
  5. ^ "Western Ghats (sub cluster nomination), Western Ghats—Sahyadri Sub-Cluster (with Four Site Elements)". UNESCO World Heritage Center. Retrieved 2008-08-05. 
  6. ^ a b "Chandoli National Park". ATREE, Eco-Informatics Center. Retrieved 2008-08-05. 
  7. ^ "Declaration of Chandoli wildlife sanctuary as National Park". Government of India, Press Information Bureau. 12 March 2007. Retrieved 2008-08-05. 

Before chandoli dam there is school Hutatma nanaksing vidhyalaya, hutatmanagar sonawade . The school established by krantisihe nagnath naikwadi after dealth of his friend at the nearest place fron location of school during battle with angrezi fauj.