Chandrabhaga

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Chandrabhaga is situated three km east of the Sun temple of Konark,[1] and 30 km from Puri. Until recent years Chandrabhaga was considered a place of natural cure for lepers.

Mythological references[edit]

Mythological 'Shamba' (Krishna's Son) the cured leper worshiped the Sun God for cure on the river mouth of Chandrabhaga, the river dried. It is reduced to a dry bed or a narrow trickle. It has been an ideal place for religious activity.

According to another mythological reference, Chandrabhag, the daughter of a sage, caught the attraction of the Sun God by her magical charm. The God came down to seek her hand in love. Chandrabhaga did not offer herself to the God. Maddened by romantic pangs, the God chased behind a frightened Chandrabhaga who jumped in to the river and killed herself, succeeded in protecting her chastity. As a mark of tribute to her sacrifice, every year on the 7th day of the full moon fortnight of Magha month, people from all over the state and outside gather to take a holy dip in the river that is reduced to a shallow pool, offer their prayers to the Sun God and enjoy the sunrise.[2]

Chandrabhaga's sacrifice might have been forgotten, but the place which bears her name is remembered as a holy shrine and the place of the Rising Sun. It continues to inspire religious and meditative activities. It has been a big hunting ground for poets, artists and lovers. A moments pause at Chandrabhaga is believed to be a great fatigue healer. Numerous visitors to Konark make Chandrabhaga a positive stop. A light house can be found close to Chandrabhaga.

Chandrabhaga is rich in her marine resources. A large colony of fishermen from Andhra Pradesh beside the dried river mouth represents the typical tribal life of India.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Chandrabhaga Beach, Konark". Visit Odisha. Odisha Tourism. Retrieved 31 May 2012. 
  2. ^ "Puri: Tourism". National Informatics Centre, Puri. Puri District Administration. Retrieved 31 May 2012. 

External links[edit]