Charles A. Hines

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
"Charles Hines" redirects here. For other uses, see Charles Hines (disambiguation).
Charles A. Hines
Portrait photo of Lieutenant Colonel Charles A. Hines circa 1979
Lieutenant Colonel Charles A. Hines circa 1979
Born Charles Alfonso Hines
(1935-09-04)September 4, 1935
Washington, D.C., U.S.
Died July 4, 2013(2013-07-04) (aged 77)
Houston, Texas, U.S.
Resting place
Arlington National Cemetery
Arlington, Virginia
Section 55, Grave 463
38°52′45″N 77°03′57″W / 38.8793°N 77.0659°W / 38.8793; -77.0659
Education
Spouse(s) Veronica L. Hines (1962–2013; his death)
Military career
Allegiance  United States
Service/branch  United States Army
Years of service
  • Approx. 1953–1956
  • Approx. 1962–1994
Rank US-O8 insignia.svg Major general
Unit 90th Military Police Detachment, Vietnam (1966–67)
Commands held
Battles/wars Vietnam War
Awards >= 14
Other work

Charles Alfonso Hines (September 4, 1935 – July 4, 2013) was an American Army Major General, university administrator, and sociology professor.

Biography[edit]

A native of Washington, D.C. where he was born on September 4, 1935,[1] Hines earned a Bachelor's degree from Howard University. Upon graduation, he entered the United States Army, where he served for more than 38 years, attaining the rank of major general. When Hines took command of Fort McClellan in July 1989, he became the first black commander of a military installation in the South. In 1991, Governor Guy Hunt awarded Hines the Alabama Distinguished Service Medal for his contributions to the Alabama National Guard at Fort McClellan. When Hines retired in 1994, he returned to his hometown to serve as Director of Health and Security at the Smithsonian Institution.[5]

Hines served as President of Prairie View A&M University from 1994 until 2002, where he oversaw its role in the Office for Civil Rights (OCR) settlement that resulted in the Texas Commitment[clarification needed] funding for four new buildings, additional master's and doctoral degree programs and dollars for development initiatives, student scholarships and endowed chairs. Hines began his career with Lone Star College–CyFair in 2008 as an Adjunct Faculty Student Advisor in Student Services. In 2010 he received the “Adjunct Excellence Award” for the 2009–10 academic year.

Awards and decorations[edit]

US Army Airborne basic parachutist badge.gif Basic Parachutist Badge[6]
Legion of Merit[6]
Bronze Star[6]
Alabama Distinguished Service Medal[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Greene, Robert Ewell (1991). Black defenders of the Persian Gulf War : Desert Shield-Desert Storm : a reference and pictorial history. Fort Washington, MD: R.E. Greene Pub. Co. p. 56. ISBN 9780945733058. Retrieved 2013-07-06. 
  2. ^ Hines, Charles (September 1990). "Military Police in Contingency Operations" (PDF). Parameters: US Army War College Quarterly 20 (3): 15. Retrieved 2013-07-06. 
  3. ^ "Commanders". Fort McClellan, US Army. Retrieved 2013-07-06. 
  4. ^ "Past Commanders of the 519th Military Police Battalion". Ft. Polk, U.S. Army. Retrieved 2013-07-06. 
  5. ^ a b Rentz, Paige (July 5, 2013). "Former McClellan head remembered as down-to-earth leader". The Anniston Star. Retrieved 2013-07-06. 
  6. ^ a b c "Maj. Gen. Charles Hines (Ret.)". Boys & Girls Clubs of America. Archived from the original on Jun 23, 2013. Retrieved 2013-07-05.