Charles Donald Jacob

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Charles Donald Jacob (1838–1898) was an American politician who served four terms as mayor of Louisville, Kentucky, two consecutively in 1873-78, then later in 1882-84 and 1888-90. He also served as the U.S. minister to Colombia in 1885-1886. He was a member of the Democratic Party.

In Mayor Jacob's third term, he oversaw the opening of the Southern Exposition. Perhaps Jacob's most lasting contribution was his fourth-term establishment in 1889 of a large park in Louisville, today called Iroquois Park, which was landscaped by Frederick Law Olmsted.

Family[edit]

Charles Jacob was the son of John J. Jacob, the financier and philanthropist who was Louisville's first millionaire, and his wife. His older brother was Richard Taylor Jacob, who became Kentucky Lieutenant Governor, and his brother-in-law was James Brown Clay, who was elected as a U.S. Representative. Jacob is interred in Cave Hill Cemetery, Louisville, Kentucky.

Legacy and honors[edit]

The Jacobs neighborhood in Louisville is named for him.

External links[edit]

Political offices
Preceded by
John G. Baxter
Mayor of Louisville, Kentucky
1873–1878
Succeeded by
John G. Baxter
Preceded by
John G. Baxter
Mayor of Louisville, Kentucky
1882–1884
Succeeded by
P. Booker Reed
Preceded by
P. Booker Reed
Mayor of Louisville, Kentucky
1888–1890
Succeeded by
William L. Lyons
Diplomatic posts
Preceded by
William L. Scruggs
United States Minister to Colombia
26 January 1886–29 May 1886
Succeeded by
Dabney H. Maury