Charles Follen Adams

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Charles Follen Adams
Portrait of Charles F. Adams (Boston: Lee & Shepard, 1878)
Born April 21, 1842
Dorchester, Massachusetts
Died March 8, 1918
Occupation American poet
Language English
Subject Adams enlisted in the 13th Massachusetts Infantry during the American Civil War. He was wounded in action at Gettysburg, and taken as a prisoner of war.
Notable works
  • 1878: Leedle Yawcob Strauss, and Other Poems
  • 1885: Mother's Doughnuts
  • 1886: Cut, Cut Behind
  • 1887: Dialect Ballads
  • 1910: Yawcob Strauss, and Other Poems


Charles Follen Adams (21 April 1842 in Dorchester, Massachusetts – 8 March 1918) was an American poet.[1][2]

Biography[edit]

He received a common school education, and at the age of fifteen entered into mercantile pursuits. During the American Civil War, at age 22, Adams enlisted in the 13th Massachusetts Infantry.[3] He was wounded in action at Gettysburg, and taken as a prisoner of war.[4][5] On his release from prison, he was detailed for hospital duty.[3]

In 1872, he began writing humorous verses for periodicals and newspapers in a Pennsylvania German dialect.[5] His first published work was “The Puzzled Dutchman” which appeared in Our Young Folks.[3]

Works[edit]

Each year links to its corresponding "[year] in poetry" article:

References[edit]

External links[edit]