Charles Gordon-Lennox, 7th Duke of Richmond

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"Goodwood". Caricature by Spy published in Vanity Fair in 1896.

Charles Henry Gordon-Lennox, 7th Duke of Richmond and Lennox, 2nd Duke of Gordon, KG GCVO (27 December 1845 – 18 January 1928), 7th Duke of Aubigny (French peerage in the French nobility), styled Lord Settrington until 1860 and Earl of March between 1860 and 1903, was a British politician and peer.

Background and education[edit]

Memorial in Chichester Cathedral

Styled Lord Settrington from birth, he was born at Portland Place, London, the eldest son of Charles Henry Gordon-Lennox, 6th Duke of Richmond and Frances Harriett, daughter of Algernon Frederick Greville. He was educated at Eton between 1859 and 1863. In 1860 he became known as the Earl of March after his father succeeded to the dukedom.[1]

Career[edit]

Lord March joined the Grenadier Guards two years later, although he retired in 1869 after he was elected Member of Parliament for West Sussex. He represented that constituency until it was abolished for the 1885 general election, when he was returned to the House of Commons for the Chichester constituency. He held his seat until 1889. Around this time, he was appointed as an Ecclesiastical Commissioner, a position he occupied until 1903. He and his brother, Lord Algernon Gordon-Lennox, served in the Second Boer War in South Africa, with Lord March in command of the Sussex Militia from his arrival in March 1901.

On 27 September 1903, Gordon-Lennox succeeded his father as 7th Duke of Richmond and Lennox and 2nd Duke of Gordon (2nd creation). In 1904, King Edward VII made him a Knight Grand Cross of the Royal Victorian Order and a Knight of the Order of the Garter. He also served as Lord Lieutenant of several counties. After his death, he was buried in Chichester Cathedral.

Family[edit]

Richmond married firstly Amy Mary, daughter of Percy Ricardo of Bramley Park at Guildford in Surrey, and sister of Col. Francis Ricardo of Cookham in Berkshire. They had three sons and two daughters.

After her death in August 1879, aged 30, he married secondly Isabel Sophie, daughter of William George Craven, in 1882. They had two daughters. Isabel died in November 1887, aged 24.

Richmond remained a widower until his death in January 1928, aged 82.

He was succeeded in the dukedom by his eldest son, Charles. Richmond's second son Lord Esmé Gordon-Lennox was a Brigadier-General in the British Army, while his third and youngest son Lord Bernard Gordon-Lennox was a Major in the Army.[1]

Ancestry[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
Hon. Henry Wyndham
Sir Walter Barttelot, Bt
Member of Parliament for West Sussex
1869–1885
With: Sir Walter Barttelot, Bt
Constituency divided
Preceded by
Lord Henry Lennox
John Abel Smith
Member of Parliament for Chichester
1885–1889
Succeeded by
Lord Walter Gordon-Lennox
Honorary titles
Preceded by
The Duke of Richmond
Lord Lieutenant of Banffshire
1903–1928
Succeeded by
Sir John Findlay, Bt
Preceded by
The Duke of Fife
Lord Lieutenant of Elginshire
1903–1928
Succeeded by
The Duke of Richmond
Peerage of England
Preceded by
Charles Gordon-Lennox
Duke of Richmond
3rd creation
1903–1928
Succeeded by
Charles Gordon-Lennox
Peerage of Scotland
Preceded by
Charles Gordon-Lennox
Duke of Lennox
2nd creation
1903–1928
Succeeded by
Charles Gordon-Lennox
Peerage of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
Charles Gordon-Lennox
Duke of Gordon
2nd creation
1903–1928
Succeeded by
Charles Gordon-Lennox