Charles Gordon Greene

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Charles Gordon Greene
Member of the
Massachusetts House of Representatives[1]
Personal details
Born July 1, 1804[2]
Boscawen, New Hampshire[2]
Died September 27, 1886[2][3]
Boston, Massachusetts[2]
Political party Democrat[1]
Spouse(s) Charlotte Hill[1]
Alma mater Bradford Academy[4]

Charles Gordon Greene (July 1, 1804 – September 27, 1886) was an American journalist.

Biography[edit]

Greene was born at Boscawen, New Hampshire. He was the brother of Nathaniel Greene, in whose care he was placed on the death of his father in 1812, and who sent him to the Bradford Academy. Subsequently he entered his brother's office in Haverhill, Massachusetts, and, following his brother to Boston, he assisted in editing the Boston Statesman. He then had brief engagements managing and editing the Taunton Free Press (1825) and then publishing the Boston Spectator (1826). He married Charlotte Hill in Boston on October 24, 1827.[1]

Greene settled in Philadelphia in 1827, and with James A. Jones started the National Palladium, in which the presidential candidacy of Andrew Jackson was vigorously advocated. In 1828 Greene was on the staff of the United States Telegraph in Washington, D.C., until after Jackson's election, when he returned to the Boston Statesman, where he succeeded his brother as proprietor. He founded the Boston Post in 1831[3] and conducted it until 1875. Greene served in the Massachusetts Legislature, and was naval officer of Boston from 1853 to 1861.

He died in Boston on September 27, 1886[2][3]

See also[edit]

  • Okay ("O.K." - a wordplay for "Oll Korrect") that has come to mean affirmation or acknowledgement.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Loring, James Spear (1853), The Hundred Boston Orators Appointed by the Municipal authorities and Other Public Bodies, From 1770 to 1852 2 ed., Philadelphia, PA: John P. Jewett and Company, p. 478. 
  2. ^ a b c d e The Publishers Weekly, Volume XXX, New York, NY: R. R. Bowker Company, October 2, 1886, p. 493. 
  3. ^ a b c Thomas, Joseph (1915), Universal Pronouncing Dictionary of Biography and Mythology Vol. 1; Fourth Edition, Philadelphia, PA: J. B. Lippincott Company, p. 1165. 
  4. ^ Loring, James Spear (1853), The Hundred Boston Orators Appointed by the Municipal authorities and Other Public Bodies, From 1770 to 1852 2 ed., Philadelphia, PA: John P. Jewett and Company, p. 477. 

References[edit]