Charles H. Sawyer

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Charles Henry Sawyer
Charles H. Sawyer.jpg
41st Governor of New Hampshire
In office
June 2, 1887 – June 6, 1889
Preceded by Moody Currier
Succeeded by David H. Goodell
Member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives
In office
1876–1878
Member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives
In office
1869–1871
Personal details
Born (1840-03-30)March 30, 1840
Watertown, New York, U.S.
Died January 18, 1908(1908-01-18) (aged 67)
Nationality American
Political party Republican
Spouse(s) Susan Ellen Cowan Sawyer
Children William Davis Sawyer
Charles Francis Sawyer
James Cowan Sawyer
Edward Sawyer
Elizabeth Coffin Sawyer
Parents Jonathan Sawyer
Martha (Perkins) Sawyer
Profession Manufacturer
Businessman
Politician
Religion Congregationalist

Charles Henry Sawyer (March 30, 1840 – January 18, 1908) was an American manufacturer, businessman and Republican politician. He served as a member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives and as the 41st Governor of New Hampshire.

Early life[edit]

Sawyer was born in Watertown, New York, the son of Jonathan Sawyer and Martha (Perkins) Sawyer.[1] When he was ten, he moved with his family to Dover, New Hampshire. Sawyer attended the common schools and Franklin Academy before learning the manufacturing business working at the Sawyer Woolen Mills Company. He became president of the company in 1881.[2]

Political career[edit]

He served in the Dover city council before becoming a member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives. Sawyer served in the State House from 1869-1871, and from 1876-1878.[3] He served as aide-de-camp to Governor Charles H. Bell in 1881,[4] and was a delegate to the 1884 Republican National Conventions.[5]

He was elected the 41st Governor of New Hampshire, serving from June 2, 1887-June 6, 1889.[6] After leaving office, he represented New Hampshire at the Universal Exposition of 1889 at Paris.[7] He served as director of the Dover Gas and Light Company and the Granite State Insurance Company, and as president of the Dover Horse Railroad Company.[8]

Sawyer died on January 18, 1908 in Dover, New Hampshire.[9]

Family life[edit]

Sawyer married Susan Ellen Cowan on February 8, 1865. They had five children together: William Davis Sawyer, Charles Francis Sawyer, James Cowan Sawyer, Edward Sawyer and Elizabeth Coffin Sawyer.[10] Their son William married Gertrude Hall, daughter of U.S. Congressman Joshua G. Hall.[11] He and his family were members of the Congregational church.[12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Herndon, Richard (2007). Men of Progress: Biographical Sketches and Portraits of Leaders in Business and Professional Life in and of the State of New Hampshire. Heritage Books. p. 103. 
  2. ^ Clarke, J.B. Clarke (1882). Sketches of Successful New Hampshire Men. J.B. Clarke. p. 250. 
  3. ^ Herndon, Richard (2007). Men of Progress: Biographical Sketches and Portraits of Leaders in Business and Professional Life in and of the State of New Hampshire. Heritage Books. p. 103. 
  4. ^ Willey, George Franklyn (1903). State Builders: An Illustrated Historical and Biographical Record of the State of New Hampshire at the Beginning of the Twentieth Century. The New Hampshire Publishing Corporation. p. 294. 
  5. ^ Johnson, Charles W. (1903). Official Proceedings of the Republican National Convention. p. 60. 
  6. ^ McClintock, John Norris (1889). Colony, Province, State, 1623-1888: History of New Hampshire. B. B. Russell. p. 681. 
  7. ^ Universal Exposition Paris, Volume 1. 1890. p. 80. 
  8. ^ Foster, G.J. (1898). Dover, New Hampshire: Its History and Industries Descriptive of the City and Its Manufacturing and Business Interests. Issued as an Illustrated Souvenir in Commemoration of the Twenty-fifth Anniversary of Foster's Daily Democrat. G.J. Foster. p. 117. 
  9. ^ Metcalf, Henry Harrison and McClintock, John Norris (1908). The Granite Monthly: A New Hampshire Magazine Devoted to History, Biography, Literature, and State Progress, Volume 40. H.H. Metcalf. 
  10. ^ Foster, G.J. (1898). Dover, New Hampshire: Its History and Industries Descriptive of the City and Its Manufacturing and Business Interests. Issued as an Illustrated Souvenir in Commemoration of the Twenty-fifth Anniversary of Foster's Daily Democrat. G.J. Foster. p. 117. 
  11. ^ "Women of Strafford County". New Hampshire Women. Retrieved March 19, 2014. 
  12. ^ Metcalf, Henry Harrison and McClintock, John Norris (1908). The Granite Monthly: A New Hampshire Magazine Devoted to History, Biography, Literature, and State Progress, Volume 40. H.H. Metcalf. 

External links[edit]



Political offices
Preceded by
Moody Currier
Governor of New Hampshire
1887–1889
Succeeded by
David H. Goodell