Charles Heathcote

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Charles Heathcote
Lloyds Bank Manchester.jpg
Born 1850
Died 1938
Nationality English
Buildings 107 Piccadilly (1899) Piccadilly
Parrs Bank (1902) York Street
Eagle Star Building (1911), Cross Street
Lloyds Bank (1915), King Street
Projects Trafford Park, Manchester

Charles Heathcote (1850 – 1938)[1] was a British architect who practised in Manchester. He was articled to the church architects Charles Hansom, of Clifton, Bristol. He was awarded the RI Medal of Merit in 1868, and started his own practice in 1872.

Heathcote built city centre buildings such as Parrs Bank (1902) York Street, the Eagle Star Building (1911), Cross Street, Lloyds Bank (1915), King Street and the earlier 107 Piccadilly textile warehouse (1899).[2] He helped plan the Trafford Park industrial estate, working for British Westinghouse and the Ford Motor Company. He designed 15 warehouses for the Manchester Ship Canal Company. He also worked on the buildings for Richard Lane (architect)'s Cheadle Royal Lunatic Asylum[1]

Eagle Insurance Building, Manchester

Buildings[edit]

Grade 2 listed
  • 53 King Street, Lloyds Bank, 1915. (now Lloyds TSB).
  • Northern Rock Insurance, corner Cross Street & King Street, 1895.
  • Eagle Insurance, 68 Cross Street, 1911.
  • Anglia House, 86 Cross Street, 1904.
  • Royal London House, 202 Deansgate, 1904.
  • Onward Buildings,[3] 205-209 Deansgate, 1903–05.
  • 107 Piccadilly for Sparrow Hardwick & Company, 1898 (now an Abode Hotel).
  • Commercial Union Buildings, 47 Spring Gardens, 1881–82.
  • 1-3 York Street, corner of Spring Gardens, 1902 (formerly Parrs Bank,[4]).
  • Joshua Hoyle Building,[5] 50 Piccadilly, 1904.
Other
Heathcote & Rawle Grade 2 listed
  • Alliance House, 28-34 Cross Street, 1901.
  • Lancashire & Yorkshire Bank, 43–45 Spring Gardens, 1890.[6]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Cocks, Harry; Wyke, Terry (2004), Public sculpture of Greater Manchester, Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, p. 448, ISBN 0-85323-567-8 
  2. ^ [1][dead link]
  3. ^ "The Onward Building". Manchesterhistory.net. Retrieved 2013-10-14. 
  4. ^ Later National Westminster Bank and now converted to other uses
  5. ^ "Joshua Hoyle Building, Including Roby House - Manchester - Manchester - England". British Listed Buildings. Retrieved 2013-10-14. 
  6. ^ "Manchester Buildings and the Architects who built Manchester?". Manchester2002-uk.com. Retrieved 2013-10-14. 

Bibliography[edit]

Hartwell, Clare (2001), Manchester, Pevsner Architectural Guides, New Haven, Conn: Yale University Press, ISBN 0-300-09666-6 

External links[edit]