Charles Hill (diplomat)

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Charles Hill
Born (1936-04-28) April 28, 1936 (age 78)
Nationality United States
Fields Humanities
Institutions Yale University
Alma mater Brown University
University of Pennsylvania
For other people named Charles Hill, see Charles Hill (disambiguation).

Charles Hill (born April 28, 1936) is the Diplomat-in-Residence and a lecturer in International Studies at Yale University.[1] A career foreign service officer, Mr. Hill was a senior adviser to George Shultz, Henry Kissinger, and Ronald Reagan, as well as Boutros Boutros-Ghali, the sixth Secretary-General of the United Nations. At Yale, he teaches, along with Paul Kennedy and John Gaddis, the seminar "Studies in Grand Strategy", a rigorous interdisciplinary study of leadership, statecraft and diplomacy. He also teaches students enrolled in the Directed Studies program. Beginning in 2006, Hill offered a new course, Oratory in Statecraft. Not since Rollin G. Osterweis, who taught "The History and Practice of American Oratory", had oratory been taught at Yale.

Hill received a B.A. from Brown University in 1960, a J.D. and an M.A. in American Studies from the University of Pennsylvania in 1960 and 1961, respectively.[2] He is a recipient of the Superior Honor Award from the State Department, the Presidential Distinguished Service Award, and the Secretary of State's Medal.[3] He holds an honorary doctorate of laws from Rowan University.[4]

Hill is a research fellow at Stanford University's Hoover Institution. Hill is also a Project for the New American Century (PNAC) signatory. Hill served as Chief Foreign Policy Advisor to Rudy Giuliani, a Republican candidate for the 2008 presidential election.

Books by Hill[edit]

  • Grand Strategies: Literature, Statecraft, and World Order, Yale, 2010
  • Trials of a Thousand Years: World Order and Islamism, Hoover, 2011

Books about Hill[edit]

  • The Man on Whom Nothing Was Lost: The Grand Strategy of Charles Hill, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2006

External links[edit]

References[edit]