Charles Howard (police officer)

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Sir Andrew Charles Howard KCB (died 11 June 1909), known as Sir Charles Howard, was the third Assistant Commissioner (Executive) of the London Metropolitan Police, serving in the post from 1890 to 1902. He was the first career police officer to be appointed an Assistant Commissioner.

Howard came from Ringmore, Devon. He was commissioned into the East India Company's army and served with Rattray's Sikhs throughout the Indian Mutiny. He then served with the police in Bengal. He was chief of police of Monghyr and Patna from 1864 to 1867, when he returned to England. He was one of the first four men appointed to the new rank of District Superintendent in the Metropolitan Police on 25 February 1869.[1] On 22 October 1886 this rank was renamed Chief Constable.

He was appointed to the post of Assistant Commissioner on 22 June 1890.[1] He retired on 29 September 1902.[1] In the King's Birthday Honours later the same year he was appointed a Knight Commander of the Order of the Bath (KCB),[2] having been appointed a Companion of the Order (CB) in 1894 and knighted in 1897.

Howard married Emily Emma Montgomery (later Dame Emma Howard) in 1871. She died on 26 February 1929.[3]

Police appointments
Preceded by
Richard Pearson
Assistant Commissioner (Executive), Metropolitan Police
1890–1902
Succeeded by
Frederick Wodehouse

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c J. F. Moylan, Scotland Yard and the Metropolitan Police, 1929
  2. ^ Birthday Honours, The Times, 10 November 1902
  3. ^ Deaths, The Times, 23 April 1929

References[edit]

  • Obituary, The Times, 12 June 1909