Charles Pélissier

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Charles Pélissier
Charles Pélissier Tour de France 1929.JPG
Personal information
Full name Charles Pélissier
Born (1903-02-20)20 February 1903
Paris, France
Died 28 May 1959(1959-05-28) (aged 56)
Paris, France
Team information
Discipline Road
Role Rider
Rider type Sprinter
Major wins
16 Tour de France stages
Infobox last updated on
15 May 2008

Charles Pélissier (20 February 1903 – 28 May 1959) was a French racing cyclist, professional between 1922 and 1939, who won 16 stages in the Tour de France. The number of eight stages won in the 1930 Tour de France is still a record, shared with Eddy Merckx (1970, 1974) and Freddy Maertens (1976). In addition to his 8 stage wins that year, Pélissier also finished second place 7 times.[1] In the 1931 Tour de France after stage 5, he shared the lead for one day with Rafaele di Paco.[2] Pélissier was the younger brother of racing cyclists Francis Pélissier and Henri Pélissier. Pélissier was born and died in Paris.

Palmares[edit]

1925
Paris-Arras
1926
 France national cyclo-cross champion
1927
 France national cyclo-cross champion
Mont-Faron
1928
 France national cyclo-cross champion
1929
Tour de France:
Winner stage 16
GP du Mathonnais
1930
Tour de France:
Winner stages 1, 3, 10, 11, 18, 19, 20 and 21
9th place overall classification
Wearing yellow jersey for one day
1931
Tour de France:
Winner stages 5, 8, 13, 16 and 24
Wearing yellow jersey for two days (one joint with Rafaele di Paco)
1933
Critérium des As
1934
Circuit de Paris
1935
Tour de France:
Winner stages 2 and 12
1938
Derby de St Germain

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Le Tour en chiffres Les autres records" (in French). LeTour.fr. 
  2. ^ McGann, Bill; McGann, Carol (2006). The Story of the Tour De France. Dog Ear Publishing. p. 118. ISBN 1-59858-180-5. Retrieved 2008-03-17. "Leading up to the Pyrenees, Italy's ace sprinter Rafaelo di Paco dueled with France's Charles Pélissier for stage wins and the lead. After stage 5 they shared the lead for a single day." 

External links[edit]