Charles P. Mountford

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This article is about the Australian anthropologist and photographer. For the Canadian poet, see Charles H. Mountford.

Charles Pearcy Mountford (8 May 1890 – 16 November 1976)[1] was an Australian anthropologist and photographer. He is known for his pioneering work on indigenous Australians and his depictions and descriptions of their art. He also led the American-Australian Scientific Expedition to Arnhem Land.

Works[edit]

  • The Art of Albert Namatjira (1944)
  • Brown Men and Red Sand (1948)
  • Australian tree portraits (1956)
  • Records of the American-Australian scientific expedition to Arnhem Land: Vol. 1 Art, myth and symbolism (1956)
  • The Tiwi: their art, myth and ceremony (1958)
  • Ayers Rock, its people, their beliefs and their art (1965) – his M.A. thesis which became a popular paperback
  • The Dreamtime (1965), The Dawn of Time (1969), and The First Sunrise (1971) – in collaboration with artist Ainslie Roberts
  • Winbaraku: and the myth of Jarapiri (1967)
  • Australian Aboriginal portraits (1967)
  • The Aborigines and their country (1969)
  • Nomads of the Australian Desert (1976) – withdrawn after sale for cultural reasons related to its depictions of sacred sites[1][2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Jones, Philip (2000). Australian Dictionary of Biography "Mountford, Charles Pearcy (1890–1976)". Australian Dictionary of Biography. National Centre of Biography, Australian National University. Retrieved 2014-09-05. 
  2. ^ Murray, Ian (22 April 1977). "The Aborigines now must suffer Australia's rush of conscience". The Times (London, England). p. 10. A book by Charles Mountford, noted Australian anthropologist, was legally prevented from publication earlier this year because it told some of the secrets of the Pitjanjatjara tribe. 

External links[edit]