Charles Robartes, 2nd Earl of Radnor

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Charles Bodvile Robartes
2nd Earl of Radnor

Charles Bodvile Robartes, 2nd Earl of Radnor PC FRS (1660–1723) was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1679 until 1681 and again in 1685 until he inherited a peerage as Earl of Radnor. He was styled Viscount Bodmin from 1682 to 1685.[1]

Family[edit]

Robartes was the son of Robert Robartes, Viscount Bodmin, eldest son of John Robartes, 1st Earl of Radnor and his wife Sarah Bodvel, daughter of John Bodvel of Bodvile Castle, Cornwall. His father was ambassador to Denmark in 1681, and his mother was a noted beauty. She should have been a considerable heiress, but on her father's death a new will was found in favour of Thomas Wynn, son of Sir Richard Wynn, 2nd Baronet, which involved the Robartes family in years of litigation.[citation needed]

In 1679 Robartes was elected Member of Parliament for Bossiney and held the seat until 1681. On the death of his father in 1682 he inherited the courtesy title Viscount Bodmin. He was elected MP for Cornwall in 1685 but later in the year he inherited the title of Baron Robartes and the earldom on the death of his grandfather John Robartes, 1st Earl of Radnor.[1]

Charles Robartes married Elizabeth Cutler in 1689.

In 1689 Radnor married Elizabeth, daughter of Sir John Cutler, 1st Baronet[1] who brought with her major estates including Harewood and Wimpole Hall. The marriage, a love-match not endorsed by her father, is reported by all accounts to have been particularly happy but there were no children. By the terms of the marriage settlement on her death without an heir, 13 January 1697, these estates reverted to the ownership of her father's heirs, her cousins, the Boulter family.[2]

He was at various times a Privy Counsellor, the Lord Warden of the Stannaries, Lord Lieutenant of Cornwall and Custos Rotulorum of Cornwall and Treasurer of the Chamber.[1]

He was succeeded by his nephew Henry Robartes 3rd Earl of Radnor who died unmarried in Paris in 1741. The title became extinct on the death of the fourth earl, John Robartes (1686–1757), eldest son of Francis Robartes a son of the first Earl's second marriage.[3]

See also[edit]

List of deserters from James II to William of Orange

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Paula Watson, The History of Parliament: The House of Commons, 1660-1690 (3 Vols), Boydell & Brewer, 1983, The History of Parliament
  2. ^ R52/12/39/1, Repository CRO Cambridge
  3. ^ Dictionary of National Biography, Robartes, John, first Earl of Radnor (1606–1685), by C. H. Firth. Published 1896.

References[edit]

Parliament of England
Preceded by
William Coryton
John Tregagle
Member of Parliament for Bossiney
1679–1681
With: Narcissus Luttrell 1679–1681
Sir Peter Colleton 1681–1685
Succeeded by
John Cotton
John Mounsteven
Preceded by
Francis Robartes
Sir Richard Edgcumbe
Member of Parliament for Cornwall
1685
With: Lord Lansdown
Succeeded by
Lord Lansdown
Francis Robartes
Political offices
Preceded by
The Earl of Bath
Lord Warden of the Stannaries
1701–1702
Succeeded by
The Lord Granville
Preceded by
The Lord De La Warr
Treasurer of the Chamber
1714–1720
Succeeded by
Henry Pelham
Honorary titles
Preceded by
The Earl of Bath
Lord Lieutenant of Cornwall
1696–1702
Succeeded by
The Lord Granville
Custos Rotulorum of Cornwall
1696–1702
Preceded by
The Earl of Rochester
Lord Lieutenant and
Custos Rotulorum of Cornwall

1714–1723
Vacant
Title next held by
Richard Edgcumbe
Peerage of England
Preceded by
John Robartes
Earl of Radnor
1685–1723
Succeeded by
Henry Robartes