Charles S. Baker

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This article is about the U.S. politician. For other people, see Charles Baker (disambiguation).
Charles Simeon Baker
Charles Simeon Baker 2.jpg
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 30th district
In office
March 4, 1885 – March 3, 1891
Preceded by Halbert S. Greenleaf
Succeeded by Halbert S. Greenleaf
Personal details
Born February 18, 1839 (1839-02-18)
Churchville, New York
Died April 21, 1902 (1902-04-22) (aged 63)
Washington, D.C.
Citizenship  United States
Political party Republican
Spouse(s) May L. Baker

Jane E. Baker

Alma mater New York Seminary at Lima
Profession lawyer

politician

Military service
Allegiance United States United States of America
Service/branch United States Army
Rank First Lieutenant
Unit Company E, Twenty-seventh Regiment, New York Volunteer Infantry
Battles/wars American Civil War

Charles Simeon Baker (February 18, 1839 – April 21, 1902) was an American politician and a U.S. Representative from New York.

Biography[edit]

Born in Churchville, New York, Baker attended the common schools, Cary Collegiate Institute of Oakfield, and the New York Seminary at Lima. He married May L. Baker and Jane E. Baker.[1]

Career[edit]

Baker taught school while he studied law. He was admitted to the bar in December 1860 and commenced practice in Rochester, New York.

During the Civil War, Baker served in the Union Army as first lieutenant, Company E, Twenty-seventh Regiment, New York Volunteer Infantry. Disabled in the first Battle of Bull Run, he was honorably discharged.

Baker was a member of the New York State Assembly (Monroe County, 2nd District) in 1879, 1880 and 1882. He was a member of the New York State Senate (29th District) in 1884 and 1885.[2]

Elected as a Republican to the 49th, 50th, and 51st United States Congresses, Baker was U.S. Representative for the thirtieth district of New York from March 4, 1885, to March 3, 1891.[3] He served as Chairman of the House Committee on Commerce during the 51st Congress. He resumed the practice of law in Rochester, New York.

Death[edit]

Baker died, from paralysis of the throat, in Washington, D.C., on April 21, 1902 (age 63 years, 62 days). He is interred at Mount Hope Cemetery, Rochester, New York.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Charles S. Baker". Find A Grave. Retrieved 13 August 2013. 
  2. ^ "Charles S. Baker". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 13 August 2013. 
  3. ^ "Charles S. Baker". Govtrack US Congress. Retrieved 13 August 2013. 
  4. ^ "Charles S. Baker". The Political Graveyard. Retrieved 13 August 2013. 

External links[edit]


New York State Senate
Preceded by
Edmund L. Pitts
New York State Senate
29th District

1884–1885
Succeeded by
Edmund L. Pitts
United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Halbert S. Greenleaf
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 30th congressional district

March 4, 1885, to March 3, 1891
Succeeded by
Halbert S. Greenleaf