Charles Stanley Reinhart

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Charles S. Reinhart
Photo of Charles Stanley Reinhart pre-1896.jpg
Charles S. Reinhart
Born Charles Stanley Reinhart
(1844-05-16)May 16, 1844
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Died August 30, 1896(1896-08-30) (aged 52)
New York, New York
Nationality American
Known for Illustration, painting

Charles Stanley Reinhart (May 16, 1844 - August 30, 1896) was an American painter and illustrator.

Biography[edit]

He was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. After having been employed in railway work and at a steel factory, he studied art at the Atelier Suisse in Paris and at the Munich Academy under Straehuber and Otto. Afterwards he settled in New York City, but spent the years 1882-1886 in Paris where he exhibited regularly in the Salon. As a young artist, he along with Edwin Austin Abbey, Robert Blum, A.B. Frost and Howard Pyle, studied under Charles Parsons, who was head of the art department at Harper Brothers in 1870s.[1]

Gallery[edit]

Works[edit]

Among his works are:

  • “Reconnoitring”
  • “Caught Napping”
  • “September Morning”
  • “Moonshiners” (Harper's Weekly, November 2, 1878)[2]
  • “At the Ferry” (watercolor, 1878)
  • “The Old Life Boat” (oil, 1880)
  • "Obadiah Holmes" (1881)
  • “Spanish Barber” (watercolor, 1884)
  • “Mussel Fisherwoman” (oil, 1886)
  • “Washed Ashore” (won a gold medal at Philadelphia in 1888; oil, 1887)
  • “Rising Tide” (purchased by the government at the Paris Exposition, 1889; oil, 1888)
  • “Normandy Coast”
  • “Gathering Wood” (watercolor, 1887)
  • “Sunday”
  • “English Garden”

Black and white series[edit]

Family[edit]

Reinhart was a nephew of painter Benjamin Franklin Reinhart.

Literary significance and criticism[edit]

It has been argued that the short story The Sculptor's Funeral by Willa Cather uses Charles Stanley Reinhart as the prototype for its protagonist. Cather wrote a feature story about the first anniversary of the death of Reinhart in 1897 when she attended the erection of his monument Allegheny Cemetery in Pittsburgh.[3]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Reed, Walt and Roger (1984). The Illustrator in American 1880-1980. Society of Illustrators. pp. 41 & 63. 
  2. ^ Shirley Stipp ephemera collection (visited 26 August 2010) which has the entry: C. S. Reinhart, “Moonshiners,” Harper's Weekly, Vol. XXII, No. 1140 (November 2, 1878), p. 875.
  3. ^ Bernice Slote, 'Willa Cather and Her First Book', Willa Cather, April Twilights, University of Nebraska Press, 1968, page xlii

References[edit]

Attribution