Charles Tallman

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Charles Tallman
Charles Tallman.png
Tallman pictured in The Monticola 1934, West Virginia yearbook
Sport(s) Football, basketball
Biographical details
Born (1900-09-18)September 18, 1900[1]
Tariff, West Virginia
Died November 16, 1973(1973-11-16) (aged 73)[2]
Augusta, Georgia
Playing career
Football
1920–1923

West Virginia
Position(s) End
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
1925–1928
1934–1936

Basketball
1925–1926

Marshall
West Virginia


Marshall
Head coaching record
Overall 37–21–9 (football)
10–7 (basketball)
Statistics
College Football Data Warehouse
Accomplishments and honors
Awards
All-American, 1923

Charles Cameron "Trusty" Tallman (September 18, 1900 – November 16, 1973) was an American football player and, coach of football and basketball, and law enforcement officer. He served as the head football coach at Marshall University from 1925 to 1928 and at West Virginia University from 1934 to 1936, compiling a career college football record of 37–21–9. Tallman was also the head basketball coach at Marshall during the 1925–26 season, tallying a mark of 10–7. He resigned after the 1936 season to become the Superintendent of the West Virginia State Police.[3] Tallman was also a member of the West Virginia Legislature.[4] He later lived in Augusta, Georgia.

Head coaching record[edit]

Football[edit]

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs
Marshall Thundering Herd (West Virginia Intercollegiate Athletic Conference) (1925–1928)
1925 Marshall 4–1–4
1926 Marshall 5–4–1
1927 Marshall 5–3–1
1928 Marshall 8–1–1
Marshall: 22–9–7
West Virginia Mountaineers (Independent) (1934–1936)
1934 West Virginia 6–4
1935 West Virginia 3–4–2
1936 West Virginia 6–4
West Virginia: 15–12–2
Total: 37–21–9

References[edit]

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ [2]
  3. ^ "Glenn Named Grid Coach". The Pittsburgh Press. July 2, 1937. Retrieved November 9, 2011. 
  4. ^ "W. VA. SELECTS TALLMAN.; Names Member of State Legislature Football Coach". The New York Times. February 17, 1934. Retrieved November 9, 2011. 

External links[edit]