Charles V. Hamilton

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Charles V. Hamilton (born 1929) is a political scientist, civil rights leader, and the W. S. Sayre Professor Emeritus of Government and Political Science at Columbia University.[1]

Biography[edit]

Hamilton was born in Muskogee, Oklahoma. He graduated from Roosevelt University in 1951,[2] and went on to earn a masters degree in 1957 from the University of Chicago.[1] He joined the Tuskegee Institute faculty in 1958, but his contracted there was terminated in 1960,[2] and he returned to the University of Chicago, where he earned a Ph.D. in 1964.[1] He held faculty positions at Rutgers University, Lincoln University (Pennsylvania), and Roosevelt University before joining the Columbia University faculty in 1969.[2] Hamilton retired from the Columbia faculty in 1998 and later moved to Chicago.

His most noted work is Black Power: The Politics of Liberation in America, written with Stokely Carmichael.[1][2]

Cashmore and Jennings argue the Hamilton and Carmichael were the first to use the term institutional racism in a systematic fashion.[3]

Texts[edit]

  • Carmichael S. & Hamilton C. V. (1967), Black Power: The Politics of Liberation in America, New York: Vintage
  • Hamilton C. V. (1972), "The Black Preacher in America", New York: William Morrow
  • Hamilton C. V. (1974), Bench and the Ballot: Southern Federal Judges and Black Voters, Oxford: Oxford University Press
  • Hamilton C. V. (1981), American Government, Glenview: Scott Foresman & Co
  • Hamilton C. V. & Hamilton, D. C. (1992), Adam Clayton Powell, Jr.: The Political Biography of an American Dilemma, New York: Simon & Schuster
  • Hamilton C. V. & Hamilton, D. C. (1997), The Dual Agenda, New York: Columbia University Press

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Notable African-American Alumni, University of Chicago, accessed 23 January 2012.
  2. ^ a b c d Rich, Wilbur C. (Spring 2004), "From Muskogee to Morningside Heights: Political Scientist Charles V. Hamilton", Columbia Magazine, retrieved 2012-01-23 .
  3. ^ Cashmore, Ernest and Jennings,James (2001), Racism: Essential Readings, Sage (p. 111).