Charles W. Anderson

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Charles W. Anderson
George Pforr aka Charles W. Anderson.jpg
Charles W. Anderson, Medal of Honor recipient
Born (1844-03-15)March 15, 1844
Baltimore, Maryland
Died February 25, 1916(1916-02-25) (aged 71)
Place of burial Thornrose Cemetery (Staunton, Virginia)
Allegiance United States United States of America
Service/branch USArmy flag.jpg United States Army
Union Army
Years of service 1864 – 1865, 1866 - 1878
Rank Private
Unit 1st New York Cavalry (Lincoln)
Battles/wars American Civil War
Awards Medal of Honor ribbon.svg Medal of Honor

Charles W. Anderson (born George Pforr from March 15, 1844 – February 25, 1916) was an American soldier who received the Medal of Honor for valor during the American Civil War.

In San Antonio, Texas, the Charles W. Anderson Loop was named in his honor.

Biography[edit]

Anderson was born George Pforr on March 15, 1844 in Baltimore, Maryland. He enlisted in the Confederate States Army and served in an artillery battery under Captain Jonathan H. McClanahan, part of General John Imboden’s cavalry brigade.[1]

In February 1864, he deserted and enlisted in the 1st Regiment New York Volunteer Cavalry (Lincoln Cavalry) using the name Charles W. Anderson and the birthplace of New Orleans, Louisiana. He was assigned to Company K under Captain Edwin F. Savacool.

On March 2, 1865 at Fishersville, Virginia, Anderson captured a Confederate flag during the Battle of Waynesboro. On March 19, 1865, Anderson and other soldiers who had captured flags were given a 30 day furlough and the Medal of Honor by Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton.

Anderson mustered out in June 1865, but re-enlisted in Company M, 3rd United States Cavalry on January 11, 1866. He served 12 years, participating in the Indian Wars before receiving a hardship discharge on April 4, 1878.

Anderson settled in Staunton, Virginia near his sister Mary, and returned to his birth name of George Pforr. He married Sally Smith Garber on September 18, 1878. He applied for a Federal pension in 1905 for his military service, which was granted in 1906.

He died on February 25, 1916 at the age of 71. He is buried in Thornrose Cemetery in Staunton, Virginia.

Medal of Honor citation[edit]

Capture of unknown Confederate flag.[2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Murphy, Edward F. "The Strangest Hero of All". Blue & Gray Magazine (Columbus, Ohio). 
  2. ^ "Civil War (A-F)". Medal of Honor Recipients. Center of Military History. 

External links[edit]