Charles Wish

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Charles Wish
Charles Wish.jpg
Born Frederick Charles Peters
March 18, 1971
Nationality American
Education Los Angeles Pierce College, University of Arizona, VSSC
Known for Painting
Movement Indo-American, Surregionalism, Pop-Surrealism, Lowbrow

Charles Wish (born Frederick Peters, Los Angeles, California, 1971) is an American artist best known for visually fusing Regionalism imagery with 16th - 19th century South Asian, Tantra & Buddhist symbolism and motifs - debut show CPop Gallery, Detroit, Michigan, 2005.

Confronting the information age challenges of extreme cultural contrariety and cross-cultural interaction, as well as America’s own internal culture war, Wish draws from a diverse range of influences to deliver his style of "surregional" paintings. Citing various artists of the far-east along with American painters, including Grant Wood and Thomas Hart Benton, Wish thoughtfully combines the ontological symbolism of an esoteric philosophy with some of rural-America’s most selfsame figures and scenes.[1][2]

After spending four years (1999–2003) at a Ramakrishna, Hindu monastery, as a student of South-Asian symbolism/iconography and personal assistant to Swami Swahananda, Wish would return to the San Fernando Valley, California. It would be here, not far from where he spent his formative years, where he would set up his first studio and launch his art career. Wish now maintains two studios, the original in Southern California and one in Elk County, PA, where he and his wife are restoring and converting a large Federal-style building into a cultural center and community creative space.[3]

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References[edit]

  1. ^ "Charles Wish Solo Exhibit at CPop is Full of Odd Twists on Symbols, Images". The Detroit News/Arts & Entertainment. Retrieved 2005-07-02. 
  2. ^ "Between Art & Life". Adrian College/News & Info. Retrieved 2005-08-26. 
  3. ^ "California Couple Revives Local Land Mark". The St, Mary’s Daily Press. Retrieved 2007-08-17. 

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