Charlie Brown

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Charlie Brown
Peanuts character
Charlie Brown.png
First appearance 1947 (in Li'l Folks)
October 2, 1950 (comic strip)
Last appearance February 13, 2000 (comic strip)
Voiced by Peter Robbins (1963–1969)
Chris Inglis (1971)
Chad Webber (1972–1973)
Todd Barbee (1973–1974)
Duncan Watson (1975–1976, 1977)
Dylan Beach (1976)
Arrin Skelley (1977–1980)
Liam Martin (1978)
Michael Mandy (1980–1982)
Grant Wehr (1981)
Brad Kesten (1983, 1984, 1985, 2000)
Michael Catalano (1983)
Brett Johnson (1984–1986)
Kevin Brando (1984, 1985)
Chad Allen (1986)
Sean Collins (1986, 1988)
Erin Chase (1988–1989)
Kaleb Henley (1989, 1990)
Phil Sanfran (1991)
Jamie E. Smith (1992)
Jimmy Guardino (1994)
Justin Shenkarow (1996)
Steven Hartman (1995, 1997)
Christopher Ryan Johnson (2000)
Quinn Beswick (2000)
Wesley Singerman (2002–2003)
Adam Taylor Gordon (2003)
Spencer Robert Scott (2006)
Alex Ferris (2008)
Trenton Rogers (2011)
Information
Gender Male
Family Sally Brown (sister)
Unnamed parents
Unnamed grandparents
Unnamed uncle

Charlie Brown is the protagonist of the comic strip Peanuts by Charles M. Schulz.

Like Schulz, Charlie Brown is the son of a barber; but whereas Schulz's work is described as the "most shining example of the American success story", Charlie Brown is an example of "the great American un-success story" in that he fails in almost everything he does.[1]

History[edit]

First Peanuts strip, October 2, 1950. From left-to-right: Charlie Brown, Shermy, (original) Patty.

Charlie Brown is a "lovable loser",[2] a child possessed of endless determination and hope, but who is ultimately dominated by his insecurities.[3]

He first appeared in 1947, three years before Peanuts started, in a comic strip by Charles M. Schulz called Li'l Folks. He later appeared in the first Peanuts comic strip, on October 2, 1950. He is one of the best-known characters in Peanuts and is considered to be the main character in the strip. Charlie Brown is always referred to by his full name (with the exception of Peppermint Patty who calls him 'Chuck,' and Marcie who calls him 'Charles') and his usual catchphrase is "good grief".

Despite the frequent abuse and belittling at the hands of other kids, Charlie Brown has many friends from school and on his baseball team. His best friend, however, is Linus van Pelt. One of the running gags in the strip is when his friend Lucy holds a football for Charlie Brown to kick, she pulls it away from the ground at the last second, making Charlie Brown go flying up in to the air, and landing on the ground flat on his back, usually replying "good grief". Lucy always tries to get him to do it.

Charlie Brown stated in an early strip (November 3, 1950[4]) that he was "only four years old", but he aged over the next two decades, being six years old as of November 17, 1957 and "eight-and-a-half years old" by July 11, 1979. Later references continue to peg Charlie Brown as being approximately eight years old.[5] Another early strip, on October 30, 1950, has Patty and Shermy wishing Charlie Brown a happy birthday on that day, although they are not sure they have the date right.[5]

Personality[edit]

Charlie Brown is always kind of depressed. He is often called a blockhead and he calls himself a "blah". He goes to the psychiatrist (Lucy van Pelt) for help about life usually resulting in how she thinks she is so great, and getting paid a nickel for it. He is pretty much always nice to everyone, but in return he is laughed at by most other kids with the exception of Linus van Pelt, his most loyal friend.

Reception[edit]

Along with Snoopy, he was ranked eighth on TV Guide's 50 Greatest Cartoon Characters of All Time.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ The World Encyclopedia of Comics edited by Maurice Horn, ISBN 0-7910-4854-3, ISBN 978-0-7910-4854-2
  2. ^ Mendelson, Lee (1970). Charlie Brown & Charlie Schulz. New York: World Publishing Company. LCCN 75107642.  The dust jacket describes the book as "The warmhearted biography of a wonderful man (real) and a wonderful boy (almost-as-real) who proved that being a loser could be the biggest success story of all."
  3. ^ Furness, Adrienne (2008). "Peanuts". St. James Encyclopedia of Pop Culture, BNET. CNET Networks, Inc. Retrieved 30 March 2008. 
  4. ^ "Peanuts Cartoon 3 November 1950". 3 November 1950. Retrieved 18 September 2013. 
  5. ^ a b Bang, Derrick (11 March 2011). "Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) about Charles Schulz and his Peanuts cartoon strip" (text). FiveCentsPlease.org. Retrieved 17 January 2011. 
  6. ^ "TV Guide's 50 Greatest Cartoon Characters". 30 July 2002. Retrieved 17 September 2013.