Chartham

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Chartham
Village Church, Chartham - geograph.org.uk - 663007.jpg
St Mary's Church with part of the Green
Hoppers Oast, Hatch Lane, Chartham Hatch, Kent - geograph.org.uk - 1501876.jpg
Chartham Hatch
Chartham is located in Kent
Chartham
Chartham
 Chartham shown within Kent
Area  20.84 km2 (8.05 sq mi)
Population 4,261 (Civil Parish)[1]
   – density  204/km2 (530/sq mi)
OS grid reference TR108549
Civil parish Chartham
District City of Canterbury
Shire county Kent
Region South East
Country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town CANTERBURY
Postcode district CT4 7
Dialling code 01227
Police Kent
Fire Kent
Ambulance South East Coast
EU Parliament South East England
UK Parliament Canterbury
List of places
UK
England
Kent

Coordinates: 51°15′18″N 1°01′14″E / 51.255°N 1.0205°E / 51.255; 1.0205

Chartham is a village and civil parish on the Great Stour river in the vale of the Kent Downs, 4 miles (6 km) west of Canterbury, England. The Great Stour Way path passes through the village. A paper mill in the village has specialised in the production of tracing paper since 1938.[2] There are numerous arable farms and orchards in the parish. The village has an unmanned station, Chartham, and a manned level crossing. It has an outlying locality sharing in many of the community resources, Chartham Hatch.

History[edit]

Toponymy[edit]

The earliest recorded form of the name is Certham. The name Chartham literally means ‘Village on rough ground’, and the word "Chart" is also found in other villages in Kent with this meaning.

Modern day[edit]

The river provided power for the paper mills until some point before 1955. Paper making has been a major occupation for the last 625 years; the mill dates from the late eighteenth century.

The dovecote at Burnt House Farm is not only notable for its building's architectural merit but is also a Scheduled Ancient Monument for its importance in sending homing birds to and from important envoys such as the Archbishop of Canterbury.[3]

Geography and economy[edit]

Chartham is located on the Great Stour river and vale of the Kent Downs Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. Its paper mill specialises in the production of tracing paper. There are numerous arable farms and orchards in the parish.

The village is served by Chartham railway station and the Great Stour Way path.[4]

Governance[edit]

At the national level Chartham is in the English parliamentary constituency of Canterbury for which Julian Brazier (Conserative) has been MP since 1987.[5] At the general election of 2010, Brazier won 22,050 votes (44.8%) giving him a majority of 6,048. The Liberal Democrats won 16,002 votes (32.5%), Labour 7,940 (16.1%), and the United Kingdom Independence Party 1,907 (3.9%).[5] For European elections Chartham is in the South East England constituency.

Demography[edit]

In the census of 1801 the number of people present in the parish of Chartham, enclosing an area of about 3 square miles (8 km2) and including the settlement of Chartham Hatch, was given as 776, and this figure remained roughly stable until the late 19th century when an dramatic increase was recorded: in the census of 1881, the number was given as 2,473.[6]

Landmarks[edit]

Church[edit]

The Church of St Mary is located next to the village green and contains six bells, five of which were made by Joseph Hatch in 1605, which makes them the oldest complete set by the same bellfounder in Kent.[7][8] It was built in approximately 1294 and features a number of brasses, including that of Sir Robert de Setvans (d 1306). The stonework of its chancel windows exhibit a form of tracery, known as Kentish or split cusp tracery, which originates here.[8][9] The tower is 14th century and the renovation was in 1875 by Oxford University architect George Edmund Street.[10]

Outlying areas[edit]

Shalmsford Street[edit]

The village is contiguous with the smaller Shalmsford Street to the west, and was until recently the location of St Augustine's Mental Hospital, formerly known as the East Kent Lunatic Asylum. The site on which St Augustine's stood has now become a housing estate.

Here is the village's post office at 105 Shalmsford Street[11] and Chartham Primary School in which as well as being a school, Chartham Parish meetings are held.[12]

Chartham Hatch[edit]

Chartham Hatch is the northern upper part of the village, also known as a hamlet, of around 200 houses. It is surrounded by small woods and its orchards of apples and pears. Village Hall, formerly the school, is in the centre.

Horton[edit]

Horton or Horton Manor is a tiny hamlet northeast by the Great Stour Way with its weir, Grade II listed manor house,[13] and scheduled ancient monument manor chapel remains, later which became an oast house and agricultural storage area.[14]

Mystole House

Mystole and Thruxted[edit]

These hamlets are south west along the Great Stour and to the south east. Mystole is rich in heritage due to its focal point, Mystole House, a remarkable 16th century historic building, with architectural Grade II* status [15] and former appurtenances/outbuildings: Grade II* listed Mystole Coach House;[16] its Park; listed orangery;[17] tennis court; Archway Lodge;[18] The Tetherings[19] and Stable House. Thruxted itself has a large working farmhouse.[20]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Key Statistics; Quick Statistics: Population Density United Kingdom Census 2011 Office for National Statistics Retrieved 21 November 2013
  2. ^ "Paper Manufacturer; Arjowiggins Creative Papers Suppliers of Translucent Paper". arjowiggins-tracingpapers.com. Retrieved 24 August 2012. 
  3. ^ English Heritage. "Details from listed building database (1018874)". National Heritage List for England. 
  4. ^ "Details of path, paper mills trail and local landmarks". Canterbury City Council. Retrieved 23 May 2012. 
  5. ^ a b MPs, Lords & offices (n.d.). "Mr Julian Brazier MP". www.parliament.uk. Retrieved 29 May 2014. 
  6. ^ Vision of Britain (2009). "Chartham AP/CP". University of Portsmouth et al. chart view. Retrieved 12 June 2014. 
  7. ^ "Oldest 100 Ringing Bells in Kent". kent.lovesguide.com. 2010. Retrieved 24 August 2012. 
  8. ^ a b Chartham Parish Design Statement, Canterbury City Council & Chartham Society, March 2005
  9. ^ Stephen Hart (18 Mar 2010). Medieval Church Window Tracery in England. Boydell & Brewer Ltd. p. 68. Retrieved 24 August 2012. 
  10. ^ English Heritage. "Details from listed building database (1100352)". National Heritage List for England. 
  11. ^ "Branch Finder". The Post Office. Retrieved 23 May 2012. 
  12. ^ Chartham Parish Council website
  13. ^ English Heritage. "Details from listed building database (1255391)". National Heritage List for England. 
  14. ^ English Heritage. "Details from listed building database (1085714)". National Heritage List for England. 
  15. ^ English Heritage. "Details from listed building database (1085682)". National Heritage List for England. 
  16. ^ English Heritage. "Details from listed building database (1100332)". National Heritage List for England. 
  17. ^ English Heritage. "Details from listed building database (1085684)". National Heritage List for England. 
  18. ^ English Heritage. "Details from listed building database (1348494)". National Heritage List for England. 
  19. ^ English Heritage. "Details from listed building database (1336502)". National Heritage List for England. 
  20. ^ English Heritage. "Details from listed building database (1085685)". National Heritage List for England. 

External links[edit]

Media related to Chartham at Wikimedia Commons