Chartreuse (color)

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For other uses, see Chartreuse.
Chartreuse as a tertiary color
  green
  chartreuse[1]
  yellow

Chartreuse (traditional) (Chartreuse Yellow) (#DFFF00)

Chartreuse (web) (Chartreuse Green) (#7FFF00)

Chartreuse (US /ʃɑrˈtrz/, /ʃɑrˈtrs/ or RP /ʃɑːˈtrɜːz/;[2] French pronunciation: ​[ʃaʁtʁœz]) (the web color) is a color halfway between yellow and green that was named because of its resemblance to the green color of one of the French liqueurs called green chartreuse, introduced in 1764. Similarly, chartreuse yellow is a yellow color mixed with a small amount of green that was named because of its resemblance to the color of one of the French liqueurs called yellow chartreuse, introduced in 1838.[3]

Etymology[edit]

The French word chartreuse means "charter house". The monasteries that the monks of the Carthusian order (who started producing Chartreuse liqueur in 1764) live in, the first one of which was established in 1082 by Saint Bruno, are called charter houses because they were chartered—and given generous material support—by the Duke of Burgundy known as Philip the Bold when he took over the area in 1378. Philip the Bold's elaborately decorated tomb was initially installed at a Carthusian charter house when he died in 1404.[4]

Chartreuse (web color)[edit]

Chartreuse (web color)How to read this color infobox
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet #7FFF00
sRGBB  (rgb) (127, 255, 0)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k) (50, 0, 100, 0)
HSV       (h, s, v) (90°, 100%, 100%)
Source X11
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

At right is displayed the web color chartreuse.

The term chartreuse was first used to refer to "a pale apple-green" in 1884.[5] This was codified to refer to this brighter color when the X11 colors were formulated in 1987; by the early 1990s, they became known as the X11 web colors. The web color chartreuse is the color precisely halfway between green and yellow, so it is 50% green and 50% yellow. It is one of the tertiary colors of the HSV color wheel, also known as the RGB color wheel. Another name for this color is chartreuse green.[6]


Chartreuse yellow[edit]

Chartreuse (traditional)How to read this color infobox
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet #DFFF00
sRGBB  (rgb) (223, 255, 0)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k) (13, 0, 100, 0)
HSV       (h, s, v) (68°, 100%, 100%)
Source Maerz and Paul[7]
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)
A bottle of yellow chartreuse liqueur

The color name chartreuse yellow, also known as chartreuse (traditional) or traditional chartreuse, refers to the much more yellowish tone of chartreuse than the web color "chartreuse" that was generally regarded as "chartreuse" (and still is regarded as such by many) before the X11 color chartreuse (shown above) was formulated in 1987.[8]

The first recorded use of chartreuse (meaning the color that is now called chartreuse yellow) in English was in 1892.[9]


Variations of chartreuse[edit]

Nyanza[edit]

NyanzaHow to read this color infobox
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet #E9FFDB
sRGBB  (rgb) (233, 255, 219)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k) (9, 0, 14, 0)
HSV       (h, s, v) (97°, 14%, 100%)
Source [Unsourced]
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

The color nyanza is displayed at right.

The first recorded use of nyanza as a color name in English was in 1892.[10]


Mindaro[edit]

MindaroHow to read this color infobox
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet #E3F988
sRGBB  (rgb) (227, 249, 136)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k) (9, 0, 45, 2)
HSV       (h, s, v) (72°, 45%, 98%)
Source Xona.com
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

Displayed at right is the color mindaro.

The first use in English of the color name mindaro was in 2001, when it was formulated as one of the colors on the Xona.com Color List.

Pear[edit]

PearHow to read this color infobox
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet #D1E231
sRGBB  (rgb) (209, 226, 49)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k) (8, 0, 78, 11)
HSV       (h, s, v) (66°, 78%, 88%)
Source [Unsourced]
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

Pear is a desaturated chartreuse yellow color that resembles the color of the exterior surface of Anjou or Bartlett pears.

Lemon Lime[edit]

Lemon LimeHow to read this color infobox
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet #E3FF00
sRGBB  (rgb) (227, 255, 0)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k) (11, 0, 100, 0)
HSV       (h, s, v) (67°, 100%, 100%)
Source Sprite
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

Lemon-Lime is a fluorescent chartreuse color that is named after the carbonated soft drinks such as Sprite, 7 Up and Sierra Mist.


Lime[edit]

Main article: Lime (color)
LimeHow to read this color infobox
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet #BFFF00
sRGBB  (rgb) (191, 255, 0)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k) (25, 0, 100, 0)
HSV       (h, s, v) (75°, 100%, 100%)
Source Maerz & Paul[9]
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

Lime is a color that is a representation of the color of the citrus fruit called limes.

The first recorded use of lime green as a color name in English was in 1890.[11][9]


Green-yellow[edit]

Green-YellowHow to read this color infobox
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet #ADFF2F
sRGBB  (rgb) (173, 255, 47)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k) (32, 0, 82, 0)
HSV       (h, s, v) (83°, 81%, 100%)
Source X11[12]
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

Displayed at right is the web color green-yellow, a light tint of chartreuse.

Spring bud[edit]

Main article: Spring bud
Spring BudHow to read this color infobox
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet #A7FC00
sRGBB  (rgb) (167, 252, 0)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k) (34, 0, 100, 0)
HSV       (h, s, v) (88°, 90%, 63%)
Source Maerz and Paul[13]
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

Displayed at right is the color spring bud.

This was the color that was traditionally called "spring green" before the web color spring green was formulated in 1987.

The first recorded use of spring green as a color name in English (meaning the color that is now called spring bud) was in 1766.[14]


Lawn green[edit]

Lawn GreenHow to read this color infobox
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet #7CFC00
sRGBB  (rgb) (124, 252, 0)
HSV       (h, s, v) (90°, 98%, 48%)
Source X11
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)

Displayed at right is the web color lawn green, a bright tint of chartreuse.

Camouflage green[edit]

Camouflage green is a dark tint of chartreuse used to simulate foliage on uniforms, vehicles, etc. See:Olive (color).

Pistachio[edit]

PistachioHow to read this color infobox
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet #93C572
sRGBB  (rgb) (147, 197, 114)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k) (25, 0, 42, 23)
HSV       (h, s, v) (96°, 42%, 77%)
Source ISCC-NBS
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

Displayed at right is the color pistachio, also called pistachio green, a representation of the color of the interior meat of a pistachio nut. It is also a representation of the color of pistachio ice cream, one of the flavors of ice cream in spumoni, and of pistachio pudding.

The first recorded use of pistachio green as a color name in English was in 1789.[15]

Source of color: ISCC-NBS Dictionary of Color Names (1955)--Color Sample of Pistachio Green (Color Sample #135).

Limerick[edit]

LimerickHow to read this color infobox
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet #9DC209
sRGBB  (rgb) (157, 194, 9)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k) (19, 0, 95, 21)
HSV       (h, s, v) (72°, 95%, 76%)
Source Xona.com
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

Displayed at right is the color limerick.

The first use of the color name limerick was in 2001, when it was formulated as one of the colors on the Xona.com Color List.

Yellow-green[edit]

Yellow-GreenHow to read this color infobox
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet #9ACD32
sRGBB  (rgb) (154, 205, 50)
HSV       (h, s, v) (90°, 60%, 54%)
Source X11
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)

Displayed at right is the web color yellow-green, a dull medium shade of chartreuse.

Before the X11 colors were formulated in 1987, the color term yellow-green was used to refer to the color that is now designated as the web color chartreuse (chartreuse green), shown above. Now, the term "yellow-green" is used to refer to this medium desaturated shade of chartreuse.

The color of goose droppings is known as caca d'oie in French, and is a yellowish-green shade.[16]


Apple green[edit]

Apple GreenHow to read this color infobox
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet #8DB600
sRGBB  (rgb) (141, 182, 0)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k) (23, 0, 100, 29)
HSV       (h, s, v) (74°, 100%, 71%)
Source ISCC-NBS
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

Displayed at right is the color apple green, a representation of the color of the outer skin of a green apple.

The first recorded use of apple green as a color name in English was in 1648.[17]

Source of color: ISCC-NBS Dictionary of Color Names (1955)--Color Sample of Apple Green (Color Sample #115).

Avocado[edit]

AvocadoHow to read this color infobox
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet #568203
sRGBB  (rgb) (86, 130, 3)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k) (34, 0, 98, 49)
HSV       (h, s, v) (81°, 98%, 51%)
Source Pourpre.com
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

Avocado is a color that is a representation of the color of the outer surface of an avocado.

The color "avocado" is a dark yellow-green color.

Avocado was a common color for metal surfaces (including automobiles and household appliances), as well as the color harvest gold, during the whole decade of the 1970s. They were both also popular colors for shag carpets. Both colors (as well as shag carpets) went out of style by the early 1980s.


Olive[edit]

Main article: Olive (color)
Green olives
OliveHow to read this color infobox
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet #808000
sRGBB  (rgb) (128, 128, 0)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k) (0, 0, 100, 50)
HSV       (h, s, v) (60°, 100%, 50%)
Source X11 color names
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

Olive is a dark shade of yellow typically seen on green olives. Shades of olive, such as olive drab or OD green, are frequently used for camouflage, or by the military in general. The complementary color of olive is light blue.

Kombu green[edit]

Kombu from the kelp species Saccharina japonica, the source of most kombu
Kombu GreenHow to read this color infobox
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet #354230
sRGBB  (rgb) (53, 66, 48)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k) (20, 0, 27, 74)
HSV       (h, s, v) (103°, 27%, 26%)
Source Pantone TPX[18]
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

The color kombu green is displayed at right.

The color kombu green is a representation of the color of kombu, edible kelp from the family Laminariaceae widely eaten in East Asia.

The source of this color is the "Pantone Textile Paper eXtended (TPX)" color list, color #19-0417 TPX—Kombu Green.[19]

Chartreuse in nature[edit]

Algae[edit]

Chartreuse in popular culture[edit]

Electronics[edit]

  • The early green LEDs are now sometimes called chartreuse to distinguish them from more modern, deeper-green LEDs.[20]

Film[edit]

  • The 1960 Universal film Chartroose Caboose featured a "bright green" colored train car.[21]

Firefighting[edit]

ACT Fire and Rescue tankers in Chartreuse yellow
  • Since about 1973, a sort of fluorescent chartreuse yellow has been adopted as the color of fire engines in parts of the United States and elsewhere. The use of chartreuse fire engines began when New York ophthalmologist Stephen Solomon produced research claiming that sparkling bright lime-yellow paint would boost the night time visibility of emergency vehicles compared to those painted the traditional fire engine red.[22][23]The reason for this is the Purkinje Effect, i.e., the cones do not function as efficiently in dim light, so red objects appear to be black. In Australia and New Zealand this form of chartreuse yellow is also known as "ACT Yellow" as this is the color of the fire engines in the Australian Capital Territory.

Literature[edit]

Music[edit]

  • Jazz/Jump Blues saxophonist, singer, and bandleader Louis Jordan recorded the song "(You Dyed Your Hair) Chartreuse." Composed by J. Leslie McFarland and Billy Moore, the song is about a girl who dyes her hair "chartreuse." Although she thinks that the color is "mighty cute," the speaker suggests that the change of color is a ridiculous act of rebellion.[25][26]
  • A song on the Homestuck album 'The Felt' is named Chartreuse Rewind, in reference to the color associated with the album, its subject matter, and by extension the traditional color of the felt on a billiards table.[27]
  • American blues-rock band ZZ Top recorded a song called "Chartreuse" for their 2012 album La Futura.
  • American indie-pop duo Capital Cities recorded a song called "Chartreuse" for their 2013 album In a Tidal Wave of Mystery.
  • In CW McCall's song Convoy, one of the vehicles participating in the convoy is a chartreuse VW Microbus, which is assigned by the singer/speaker as an escort to a truck hauling dynamite (due to the microbus carrying "eleven long-haired friends of Jesus").

Vexillology[edit]

Video games[edit]

Wrapping the spectrum into a color wheel[edit]

If the visible spectrum is wrapped to form a color wheel, chartreuse (additive tertiary) appears midway between yellow and green:

Linear visible spectrum.svg
Visible spectrum wrapped to join green and yellow in an additive mixture of chartreuse


See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ RGB approximations of RYB tertiary colors, using cubic interpolation.[1] The colors displayed here are substantially paler than the true colors a mixture of paints would produce.
  2. ^ "Chartreuse". The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language. Houghton Mifflin/Yahoo! Inc. Retrieved 2010-01-19. 
  3. ^ "Green Chartreuse and Yellow Chartreuse". Chartreuse Liqueurs. Retrieved 2008-05-05. 
  4. ^ Kleiner, Fred S. Art Through the Ages 13th edition Boston:2010 Wadsworth/Cengage Page 398
  5. ^ The Oxford English Dictionary (Second ed.). 1989. 
  6. ^ See the 1930s version of "Chartreuse green" in the index and color samples, a color not as green as the web color chartreuse, but greener than chartreuse yellow--actually it is a representation of the actual color of green chartreuse liqueur. The first recorded use of chartreuse green as a color name in English was in 1926--Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color Page 192; Color sample of Chartreuse Green: Page 47 Plate 12 Color Sample L2
  7. ^ The color displayed in the color box above matches the color called chartreuse in the 1930 book by Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York:1930 McGraw-Hill; the color chartreuse is displayed on page 45 Plate 11, Color Sample L1.
  8. ^ The color displayed in the color box above matches the color called chartreuse in the 1930 book by Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York:1930 McGraw-Hill (the color chartreuse is displayed on page 45 Plate 11, Color Sample L1). Before 1987, this color (now called chartreuse yellow), was called simply chartreuse in A Dictionary of Color and other color sample books, and the color now called chartreuse (the web color chartreuse, i.e. chartreuse green) was called yellow-green.
  9. ^ a b c Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York:1930 McGraw-Hill Page 192
  10. ^ Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York:1930 McGraw-Hill Page 197; Color Sample of Nyanza: Page 61 Plate 19 Color Sample C4 Note: This color originated as a textile color, as indicated by the small T after the name in the index.
  11. ^ The Daily News (London) 14 July 1890. "lime, n2.". Oxford English Dictionary online version. Oxford University Press. September 2011. Retrieved 2011-11-15.  (subscription or UK public library membership required)
  12. ^ "W3C TR CSS3 Color Module, HTML4 color keywords". W3.org. Retrieved 2009-04-15. 
  13. ^ The color displayed in the color box above matches the color called spring green in the 1930 book by Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York:1930 McGraw-Hill; the color spring green is displayed on page 59, Plate 18, Color Sample J7.
  14. ^ Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York:1930 McGraw-Hill Page 205; Color Sample of Spring Green: Page 59 Plate 18 Color Sample J7
  15. ^ Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York:1930 McGraw-Hill Page 202; Color Sample of Pistachio Green: Page 61 Plate 19 Color Sample C6
  16. ^ Dumas, Firoozeh (May 4, 2010). "A Guide To The Gritty Side Of The French Language". My Guilty Pleasure. NPR books. Retrieved 30 June 2012. 
  17. ^ Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York:1930 McGraw-Hill Page 189; Color Sample of Apple Green: Page 61 Plate 19 Color Sample J6
  18. ^ Type the words "Kombu Green" into the indicated window on the Pantone Color Finder and the color will appear.
  19. ^ Pantone TPX Pantone Color Finder--Type the words "Kombu Green" into the indicated window on the Pantone Color Finder and the color will appear:
  20. ^ "Green LED info wanted -- pure green, not yellow-green". Ask MetaFilter. Retrieved 2008-05-05. 
  21. ^ "N.Y. Times Overview of the film Chartroose Caboose:". Movies.nytimes.com. Retrieved 2009-04-15. 
  22. ^ Rationale behind chartreuse fire engines Los Angeles Times July 7, 1995 by Stephanie Simon:
  23. ^ YouTube video of chartreuse fire engines in a 4th of July parade:
  24. ^ http://www.usatoday.com/life/books/story/2012/09/18/chelsea-handler-to-write-50-shades-of-chartreuse/57801518/1
  25. ^ Jordan, Louis. "(You Dyed Your Hair) Chartreuse)." By J. Leslie McFarland and Blly Moore. Let the Good Times Roll: The Anthology 1938-1953. Rec. 1950. MCA, 1999.
  26. ^ Lyrics of the Louis Jordan song “(You Died Your Hair) Chartreuse”
  27. ^ Chartreuse Rewind on the Homestuck album page
  28. ^ "Baratpur—Indian Princely State—the only political entity ever to have a chartreuse colored flag:". Fotw.us. Retrieved 2009-04-15. 
  29. ^ "No One Lives Forever Game Guide". Gamespot.com. 1996-08-20. Retrieved 2009-04-15. 

External links[edit]