Chattanooga Zoo at Warner Park

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Chattanooga Zoo
Location Warner Park, Chattanooga, Tennessee, USA
Coordinates 35°02′35″N 85°16′58″W / 35.0431°N 85.2829°W / 35.0431; -85.2829Coordinates: 35°02′35″N 85°16′58″W / 35.0431°N 85.2829°W / 35.0431; -85.2829
Land area 13 acres (5.3 ha)
Memberships AZA[1]
Major exhibits Himalayan Passage, Gombe Forest, Corcovado Jungle, Walkin' the Tracks, Warner Park Ranch, Deserts of the World(Coming soon- Forrest of the World).
Website www.chattzoo.org

The Chattanooga Zoo at Warner Park (formerly the Warner Park Zoo) is a 13-acre (5.3 ha) zoological park located in Warner Park in Downtown Chattanooga, Tennessee. The zoo was established in 1937 by Colonel F. G. Oxley of Bridgeport, Alabama when he donated $500 to open the first public zoo in Chattanooga. The zoo is also accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums.

Exhibits and facilities[edit]

Hank the chimp

The most notable exhibit is Himalayan Passage, which houses the zoo's red panda. The exhibit boasts the largest indoor red panda exhibit in the world, despite the Chattanooga Zoo being one of the smallest zoos accredited by the AZA. The Himalayan Passage passage was expanded in 2006 to include habitats for snow leopards and Hanuman langurs.

The Gombe Forest is a $2.1 million exhibit that is home to the zoo's chimpanzees. The Gombe Forest is an indoor/outdoor exhibit built in 2001 to house Hank, the zoo's long-time resident, as well as the other chimps. Hank was donated to the zoo in 1976, and died of natural causes at age 42 on January 24, 2011. The Donovan Interpretive Center features an indoor chimpanzee viewing area and other small exhibits.

The Corcovado Jungle is home to animals from Latin America, including jaguars, spider monkeys, macaws, and capybaras.

Walkin' the Tracks holds the zoo's North American animals, including prairie dogs and white-tailed deer. The Cougar Express has indoor viewing in a train car for the zoo's cougars.

A new front entrance complex opened in 2008, and includes new parking areas, a gift shop, restroom facilities, a concessions pavilion, and an endangered species carousel.

Conservation[edit]

The Chattanooga Zoo is actively involved in conservation efforts, specifically the AZA's Species Survival Plan which manages the breeding, conservation, and welfare of endangered species throughout AZA accredited facilities in North America. Since 1998, the zoo has also been a partner with the Zoo Conservation Outreach Group/Fundacion Zoologica (ZCOG). ZCOG is an organization that partners with Latin American zoos and assists with conservation initiatives in Latin America, specifically the saving of the Amazon Rainforest.

The future[edit]

The zoo is currently undergoing a five-phase, $12 million Master Plan that is transforming it into an excellent zoological facility. In the last 10 years, the zoo has expanded from 1.5 acres (0.61 ha) to its current 13 acres (5.3 ha). The Master Plan includes new exhibits and expansion of the animal collection to specifically include African penguins, gibbons, and Komodo dragons.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "List of Accredited Zoos and Aquariums". aza.org. AZA. Retrieved 9 April 2011. 

External links[edit]