Chen Jingrun

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Chen Jingrun
Chen Jing-run.JPG
Born (1933-05-22)May 22, 1933
Fuzhou, Fujian Province, China
Died March 19, 1996(1996-03-19) (aged 62)
Nationality Chinese
Fields Mathematics
Alma mater Chinese Academy of Sciences
Xiamen University
Doctoral advisor Hua Luogeng
Known for Chen's theorem, Chen prime

Chen Jingrun (simplified Chinese: 陈景润; traditional Chinese: 陳景潤; pinyin: Chén Jǐngrùn; Wade–Giles: Ch'en Chingjun; Foochow Romanized: Dìng Gīng-ê̤ṳng, May 22, 1933 – March 19, 1996) was a Chinese mathematician who made significant contributions to number theory.

Personal life[edit]

Chen was the third son in a large family from Fuzhou, Fujian, China. His father was a postal worker. Chen Jingruen graduated from the Mathematics Department of Xiamen University in 1953. His advisor at Chinese Academy of Sciences was Hua Luogeng.

Research[edit]

His work on the twin prime conjecture, Waring's problem, Goldbach's conjecture and Legendre's conjecture led to progress in analytic number theory. In a 1966 paper he proved what is now called Chen's theorem: every sufficiently large even number can be written as the sum of a prime and a semiprime (the product of two primes) — e.g., 100 = 23 + 7·11.

Commemorations[edit]

Chen's statue in Xiamen University, China.

The Asteroid 7681 Chenjingrun was named after him.

In 1999, China issued an 80-cent postage stamp, titled The Best Result of Goldbach Conjecture, with a silhouette of Chen and the inequality:

P_x(1, 2) \ge \frac{0.67xC_x}{(\log x)^2}.

Several statues in China have been built in memory of Chen. At Xiamen University, the names of Chen and four other mathematicians — Peter Gustav Lejeune Dirichlet, Matti Jutila, Yuri Linnik, and Pan Chengdong — are inscribed in the marble slab behind Chen's statue (see image).

Works[edit]

  • J.-R. Chen, On the representation of a large even integer as the sum of a prime and a product of at most two primes, Sci. Sinica 16 (1973), 157–176.
  • Chen, J.R, "On the representation of a large even integer as the sum of a prime and the product of at most two primes". [Chinese] J. Kexue Tongbao 17 (1966), 385–386.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]