Cherryvale, Kansas

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Cherryvale, Kansas
City
Location of Cherryvale, Kansas
Location of Cherryvale, Kansas
Coordinates: 37°16′5″N 95°33′3″W / 37.26806°N 95.55083°W / 37.26806; -95.55083Coordinates: 37°16′5″N 95°33′3″W / 37.26806°N 95.55083°W / 37.26806; -95.55083
Country United States
State Kansas
County Montgomery
Platted 1871
Incorporated 1880
Area[1]
 • Total 1.92 sq mi (4.97 km2)
 • Land 1.90 sq mi (4.92 km2)
 • Water 0.02 sq mi (0.05 km2)
Elevation 837 ft (255 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 2,367
 • Estimate (2012[3]) 2,293
 • Density 1,245.8/sq mi (481.0/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 67335
Area code(s) 620
FIPS code 20-12925[4]
GNIS feature ID 0469813[5]
Website CherryvaleUSA.com

Cherryvale is a city in Montgomery County, Kansas, United States. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 2,367.[6]

History[edit]

Cherryvale was founded on the land of the Osage Indians who were pushed out by veterans of the American Civil War looking for land. The first white man to purchase property and settle here was Mr. Abe Eaton, who later sold it to the Kansas City, Lawrence & Southern Kansas Railroad which then became the Leavenworth, Lawrence & Galveston Railway. The town site was platted by the railroad in 1871.[7] It was named Cherryvale from its position in the valley of Cherry Creek.[8]

From 1871-1873, the Bender family, later called the Bloody Benders, set up a small general store and inn about 7 miles (11 km) northeast and killed at least 12 travellers including one child. While the Benders hold a tragic and morbid story, these serial killers are famous in the area.[9]

In late 1903, Cherryvale was deeply affected by the death of its city marshal, William G. Jones, who was shot while attempting to serve an arrest warrant to a local resident.[citation needed]

The town grew rapidly as a railroad hub, becoming a leader in zinc mining, glass and brick production. The Edgar Zinc Company was once the world's largest zinc smeltering facility. By 1920, 4,698 people called Cherryvale home, and in 1925 the community featured 20 groceries, 10 restaurants, 2 theatres (the Liberty Theatre and the Royal Theatre), 11 churches, and a "Cherryvale Business College." There were also six brick plants that used the abundant natural gas of the area to fuel their kilns cheaply.[citation needed]

Cherryvale once lay on the 90-mile route of the electric interurbans run by the Union Traction Company, with trolley tracks occupying the center of Main Street until 1947. Local boys during the 1930s liked to "soap" the trolley rails as a prank, halting the progress of interurban cars until a motorman climbed down and applied sand.[citation needed]

By 1940, the local brickyards had ceased production, and population declined to 3,185 inhabitants. Since the 1970s- with the loss of light manufacturing firms- the number of the town's residents has dwindled further.[citation needed]

The city is currently the headquarters for the South Kansas and Oklahoma Railroad, a shortline that runs 511 miles of track in Kansas and Oklahoma.The railroad, owned by WATCO, painted SD-40-2 4158, in the High School's colors of Blue & White in 2011, and the unit is stationed at the New yard, completed 2013, north of Cherryvale.

Geography[edit]

Cherryvale is located at 37°16′5″N 95°33′3″W / 37.26806°N 95.55083°W / 37.26806; -95.55083 (37.268010, -95.550778).[10] According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.92 square miles (4.97 km2), of which, 1.90 square miles (4.92 km2) is land and 0.02 square miles (0.05 km2) is water.[1] Is self-described as the "Gateway to Big Hill Lake."

Climate[edit]

The climate in this area is characterized by hot, humid summers and generally mild to cool winters. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Cherryvale has a humid subtropical climate, abbreviated "Cfa" on climate maps.[11]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1910 4,304
1920 4,698 9.2%
1930 4,251 −9.5%
1940 3,185 −25.1%
1950 2,952 −7.3%
1960 2,783 −5.7%
1970 2,609 −6.3%
1980 2,769 6.1%
1990 2,464 −11.0%
2000 2,386 −3.2%
2010 2,367 −0.8%
U.S. Decennial Census

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 2,367 people, 930 households, and 615 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,245.8 inhabitants per square mile (481.0/km2). There were 1,087 housing units at an average density of 572.1 per square mile (220.9/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 94.3% White, 1.0% African American, 1.3% Native American, 0.3% Asian, 0.2% Pacific Islander, 0.8% from other races, and 2.1% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.0% of the population.

There were 930 households of which 34.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.1% were married couples living together, 12.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 7.4% had a male householder with no wife present, and 33.9% were non-families. 29.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.50 and the average family size was 3.05.

The median age in the city was 36.9 years. 27.1% of residents were under the age of 18; 8.6% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 23.8% were from 25 to 44; 24.6% were from 45 to 64; and 16% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 49.6% male and 50.4% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 2,386 people, 982 households, and 639 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,537.2 people per square mile (594.3/km²). There were 1,142 housing units at an average density of 735.7 per square mile (284.5/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 94.09% White, 0.08% African American, 1.97% Native American, 0.13% Asian, 1.30% from other races, and 2.43% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.77% of the population.

There were 982 households out of which 31.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.7% were married couples living together, 11.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.9% were non-families. 31.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 15.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.39 and the average family size was 2.98.

In the city the population was spread out with 26.8% under the age of 18, 8.2% from 18 to 24, 26.9% from 25 to 44, 21.2% from 45 to 64, and 16.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 91.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.2 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $27,917, and the median income for a family was $33,599. Males had a median income of $25,964 versus $19,356 for females. The per capita income for the city was $13,655. About 13.0% of families and 18.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 26.4% of those under age 18 and 15.7% of those age 65 or over.

Education[edit]

USD 447 is home to Lincoln Central Elementary School (Cherryvale) (K-6), Thayer Elementary (K-8) and Cherryvale Middle/High School (7-12). They compete in the Tri-Valley League and the mascot is the Charger, represented by a knight. It was previously the Fighting Cherries. The mascot was changed in 1969 by the high school student council after an overwhelming vote of the student body.

Notable people[edit]

1891 Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway route map from Grain Dealers and Shippers Gazetteer.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]

City
Schools
Historical
Maps