Chester Borough, New Jersey

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Chester Borough, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Chester
Downtown Chester
Downtown Chester
Chester Borough highlighted in Morris County. Inset: Location of Morris County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Chester Borough highlighted in Morris County. Inset: Location of Morris County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Chester Borough, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Chester Borough, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°47′26″N 74°41′24″W / 40.790536°N 74.689923°W / 40.790536; -74.689923Coordinates: 40°47′26″N 74°41′24″W / 40.790536°N 74.689923°W / 40.790536; -74.689923[1][2]
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Morris
Incorporated April 3, 1930
Government[7]
 • Type Borough
 • Mayor Janet Hoven (term ends December 31, 2018)[3][4]
 • Administrator / Clerk Valerie A. Egan[5][6]
Area[1]
 • Total 1.596 sq mi (4.131 km2)
 • Land 1.594 sq mi (4.127 km2)
 • Water 0.002 sq mi (0.004 km2)  0.10%
Area rank 442nd of 566 in state
37th of 39 in county[1]
Elevation[8] 866 ft (264 m)
Population (2010 Census)[9][10][11]
 • Total 1,649
 • Estimate (2013)[12] 1,675
 • Rank 507th of 566 in state
38th of 39 in county[13]
 • Density 1,034.8/sq mi (399.5/km2)
 • Density rank 378th of 566 in state
28th of 39 in county[13]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07930[14]
Area code(s) 908[15]
FIPS code 3402712580[1][16][17]
GNIS feature ID 0885184[1][18]
Website www.chesterborough.org

Chester is a borough in Morris County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 1,649,[9][10][11] reflecting an increase of 14 (+0.9%) from the 1,635 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 421 (+34.7%) from the 1,214 counted in the 1990 Census.[19]

Chester Township was established as a separate political entity on April 1, 1799, including the area of both the Township and the downtown settlement which came to be the Borough. The Borough of Chester was incorporated by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on April 3, 1930, based on the results of a referendum held on April 25, 1930, and is today a separate municipality surrounded entirely by Chester Township.[20]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 1.596 square miles (4.131 km2), of which, 1.594 square miles (4.127 km2) of it was land and 0.002 square miles (0.004 km2) of it (0.10%) was water.[1][2]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1940 650
1950 754 16.0%
1960 1,074 42.4%
1970 1,299 20.9%
1980 1,433 10.3%
1990 1,214 −15.3%
2000 1,635 34.7%
2010 1,649 0.9%
Est. 2013 1,675 [12][21] 1.6%
Population sources:
1940-1990[22] 2000[23][24] 2010[9][10][11]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 1,649 people, 615 households, and 437.9 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,034.8 per square mile (399.5/km2). There were 647 housing units at an average density of 406.0 per square mile (156.8/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 90.78% (1,497) White, 1.03% (17) Black or African American, 0.49% (8) Native American, 2.30% (38) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 3.21% (53) from other races, and 2.18% (36) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 13.46% (222) of the population.[9]

There were 615 households, of which 34.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.0% were married couples living together, 7.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.8% were non-families. 25.9% of all households were made up of individuals, and 14.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.65 and the average family size was 3.17.[9]

In the borough, 27.5% of the population were under the age of 18, 5.2% from 18 to 24, 21.0% from 25 to 44, 28.7% from 45 to 64, and 17.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43.1 years. For every 100 females there were 97.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.4 males.[9]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $86,705 (with a margin of error of +/- $12,175) and the median family income was $133,250 (+/- $8,752). Males had a median income of $84,167 (+/- $38,424) versus $50,341 (+/- $9,122) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $48,565 (+/- $4,792). About 0.0% of families and 2.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 0.0% of those under age 18 and 10.5% of those age 65 or over.[25]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[16] there were 1,635 people, 609 households, and 426 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,063.0 people per square mile (409.9/km2). There were 627 housing units at an average density of 407.6 per square mile (157.2/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 94.68% White, 0.80% African American, 1.71% Asian, 2.02% from other races, and 0.80% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 6.85% of the population.[23][24]

There were 609 households out of which 34.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.6% were married couples living together, 6.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.9% were non-families. 23.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.66 and the average family size was 3.15.[23][24]

In the borough the population was spread out with 24.8% under the age of 18, 5.7% from 18 to 24, 30.0% from 25 to 44, 25.8% from 45 to 64, and 13.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 100.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.7 males.[23][24]

The median income for a household in the borough was $80,398, and the median income for a family was $106,260. Males had a median income of $76,772 versus $45,833 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $42,564. About 2.1% of families and 5.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 0.5% of those under age 18 and 5.8% of those age 65 or over.[23][24]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Chester is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The governing body consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[7] The Borough form of government used by Chester, the most common system used in the state, is a "weak mayor / strong council" government in which council members act as the legislative body with the mayor presiding at meetings and voting only in the event of a tie. The mayor can veto ordinances subject to an override by a two-thirds majority vote of the council. The mayor makes committee and liaison assignments for council members, and most appointments are made by the mayor with the advice and consent of the council.[26][27]

As of 2015, the Mayor of Chester is Republican Janet Hoven, whose term of office ends December 31, 2018. Members of the Chester Borough Council are Karen Ferrone (R, 2016), Matthew Finney (R, 2015), Elizabeth Gugliemini (R, 2015), Timothy Iversen (R, 2017), Gary Marshuetz (R, 2017), Jennifer Cooper Napolitano (R, 2016).[3][28][29][30]

Merger discussion with Chester Township[edit]

In 2007, New Jersey Governor Jon Corzine created incentives for small towns of less than 10,000 inhabitants to combine with other cities. The goal was to reduce the overall cost of government and thereby offer some tax relief. "New Jersey has 21 counties, 566 municipalities and 616 school districts, and property taxes average $6,800 per homeowner, or twice the national average."[31][32]

Chester Borough split from Chester Township in 1930 over the creation of sewer and water infrastructure in the more densely settled center of the municipality. The residents of the rural portions of the Township did not wish to financially support the construction and maintenance of a public sewer or water utility. Since that time rural Chester Township has relied upon individual private wells for water and septic systems for wastewater treatment while the Borough is primarily, although not entirely, served by public sewer and water. Concerns over the extension of utilities into the rural Township with the resultant potential for large scale growth served as an impediment to consolidation. The prohibition of utility extensions supported by the New Jersey state plan and codified in the Highlands Water Protection Act, along with the development restrictions contained in the Highlands Act have lessened those concerns. Additionally, an aggressive land conservation program in the Township has resulted in over 40% of the 29-square-mile (75 km2) Township being placed into permanent preservation, further lessening worries about potential overdevelopment. The two municipalities currently share a common K-8 school district, volunteer fire department, library, first aid squad and other municipal services. Residents are concerned about the unknown costs of a merger and a disproportionate allocation of those costs.[31]

The two mayors had publicly endorsed a cost–benefit analysis of a merger. Two past efforts failed so the towns are taking a slow and deliberate approach to determine the savings, if any.[31]

A merger vote planned for November 2010 was delayed for at least a year after Governor Christie's elimination of equalization funds that would ensure some taxpayers do not pay more due to the merger, as an analysis by the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs estimated that township residents would eee an annual increase of $128 on their property taxes while those in the borough would see an average decline of $570 in their taxes.[33]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Chester Borough is located in the 7th Congressional District[34] and is part of New Jersey's 25th state legislative district.[10][35][36] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Chester Borough had been in the 24th state legislative district.[37] Prior to the 2010 Census, Chester Borough had been part of the 11th Congressional District, a change made by the New Jersey Redistricting Commission that took effect in January 2013, based on the results of the November 2012 general elections.[37]

New Jersey's Seventh Congressional District is represented by Leonard Lance (R, Clinton Township).[38] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark, term ends 2021)[39] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus, 2019).[40][41]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 25th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Anthony Bucco (R, Boonton Town) and in the General Assembly by Tony Bucco (R, Boonton Township) and Michael Patrick Carroll (R, Morris Township).[42][43] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[44] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[45]

Morris County is governed by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders, who are elected at-large to three-year terms on a staggered basis, with either two or three seats up for election each year as part of the November general election. The Freeholder Board sets policies for the operation of six super-departments, more than 30 divisions plus authorities, commissions, boards and study committees.[46] Actual day-to-day operation of departments is supervised by County Administrator, John Bonanni.[47] As of 2014, Morris County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Thomas Mastrangelo (Montville, term ends December 31, 2016),[48] Deputy Freeholder Director David Scapicchio (Mount Olive Township, 2015),[49] Douglas Cabana (Boonton Township, 2016),[50] John Cesaro (Parsippany-Troy Hills Township, 2015),[51] Kathryn A. DeFillippo (Roxbury Township, 2016),[52] John Krickus (Washington Township, 2015)[53] and William "Hank" Lyon (Montville, 2014).[54][47][55] Constitutional officers are County Clerk Ann F. Grossi (Parsippany-Troy Hills Township, 2018),[56] Sheriff Edward V. Rochford (Morris Plains, 2016)[57] and Surrogate John Pecoraro (Mendham Borough, 2014).[47][58]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 1,038 registered voters in Chester, of which 188 (18.1%) were registered as Democrats, 500 (48.2%) were registered as Republicans and 350 (33.7%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were no voters registered to other parties.[59]

In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 64.4% of the vote (506 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 34.7% (273 votes), and other candidates with 0.9% (7 votes), among the 789 ballots cast by the borough's 1,092 registered voters (3 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 72.3%.[60][61] In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 60.6% of the vote (517 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 37.7% (322 votes) and other candidates with 1.2% (10 votes), among the 853 ballots cast by the borough's 1,102 registered voters, for a turnout of 77.4%.[62] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 66.7% of the vote (570 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 31.7% (271 votes) and other candidates with 1.2% (13 votes), among the 855 ballots cast by the borough's 1,122 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 76.2.[63]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 79.9% of the vote (437 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 18.8% (103 votes), and other candidates with 1.3% (7 votes), among the 556 ballots cast by the borough's 1,110 registered voters (9 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 50.1%.[64][65] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 69.7% of the vote (439 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 21.6% (136 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 7.1% (45 votes) and other candidates with 1.0% (6 votes), among the 630 ballots cast by the borough's 1,079 registered voters, yielding a 58.4% turnout.[66]

Education[edit]

Students in public school for Kindergarten through eighth grade attend the Chester Township Public School District, together with children from Chester Township.[67] As of the 2012-13 school year, the district's three schools had an enrollment of 1,305 students and 106.2 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 12.29:1.[68] Schools in the district (with 2012-13 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[69]) are Dickerson Elementary School[70] (grades PreK-2; 331 students), Bragg Intermediate School[71] (3-5; 435), and Black River Middle School[72] (6-8; 474).[73][74] Dickerson and Bragg Schools are located on County Route 510, east of Chester Borough; Black River Middle School is on County Route 513 (North Road), north of Chester Borough.[67]

Students in public school for grades nine through twelve in both communities attend West Morris Mendham High School, part of the West Morris Regional High School District, which serves students from the surrounding Morris County school districts of Chester Borough, Chester Township, Mendham Borough, Mendham Township and from Washington Township.[75]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 12.06 miles (19.41 km) of roadways, of which 8.37 miles (13.47 km) were maintained by the municipality, 2.58 miles (4.15 km) by Morris County and 1.11 miles (1.79 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[76]

Chester is located at the point where County Route 513 (also known as old Route 24) and U.S. Route 206 intersect.[77]

Public transportation[edit]

New Jersey Transit local bus service was provided on the MCM4 and MCM5 routes until June 2010, when NJ Transit pulled the subsidy.[78]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Chester Borough include:

Points of interest[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 14, 2013.
  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ a b Mayor & Council, Borough of Chester. Accessed January 15, 2015.
  4. ^ 2014 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs, as of December 15, 2014. Accessed April 20, 2015. As of date accessed, Robert Davis was listed as mayor with a term-end year of 2014.
  5. ^ Administrator, Borough of Chester. Accessed December 18, 2012.
  6. ^ Clerk's Office Administrator, Borough of Chester. Accessed December 18, 2012.
  7. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 110.
  8. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Chester, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 5, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Chester borough, Morris County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 18, 2012.
  10. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 11. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  11. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Chester borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed December 18, 2012.
  12. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 - 2013 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2014.
  13. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 11, 2012.
  14. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Chester, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed December 18, 2012.
  15. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Chester, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed January 5, 2014.
  16. ^ a b American FactFinder, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  17. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed October 27, 2012.
  18. ^ US Board on Geographic Names, United States Geological Survey. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  19. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed December 18, 2012.
  20. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 192. Accessed October 25, 2012.
  21. ^ Census Estimates for New Jersey April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 23, 2014.
  22. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network. Accessed September 23, 2012.
  23. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Chester borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 18, 2012.
  24. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Chester borough, Morris County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 18, 2012.
  25. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Chester borough, Morris County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 17, 2012.
  26. ^ Cerra, Michael F. "Forms of Government: Everything You've Always Wanted to Know, But Were Afraid to Ask", New Jersey State League of Municipalities. Accessed November 30, 2014.
  27. ^ "Forms of Municipal Government in New Jersey", p. 6. Rutgers University Center for Government Studies. Accessed December 1, 2014.
  28. ^ Morris County Manual 2014, p. 29. Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed January 15, 2015.
  29. ^ Hochman, Louis C. "Morris County election results 2014", NJ Advance Media for NJ.com, November 4, 2014. Accessed January 15, 2015.
  30. ^ Westhoven, William. "Morris County: New mayors, council members sworn in for 2015", Daily Record (Morristown), January 11, 2015. Accessed January 19, 2015. "Chester: Timothy Iversen and Gary W. Marshuetz, who ran unopposed for re-election to the Borough Council in November, were sworn in to office along with Hoven on Jan. 6."
  31. ^ a b c Van Dyke, Meghan (2008). "The Chesters look at forming one community". The Daily Record. Retrieved June 4, 2008. 
  32. ^ Porter, David via Associated Press. "Strapped towns eye mergers, but few reach the altar", The News & Observer, May 17, 2009. Accessed January 15, 2015.
  33. ^ Goldberg, an. "Chester merger panel puts off meeting until next year", The Star-Ledger, October 5, 2010. Accessed January 15, 2015. "Progress toward merging the two Chesters has slowed to a crawl, and the consolidation commission charged with studying the feasibility of it has decided not to meet again until 2011.... A DCA report delivered in May showed that the merger, based on 2009 data, would reduce borough taxes by approximately $570 on a home assessed at the borough average of $528,000. It would increase township taxes $128 on a home assessed at $826,000, the township average."
  34. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  35. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 56, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  36. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  37. ^ a b 2011 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 56, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  38. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  39. ^ About Cory Booker, United States Senate. Accessed January 26, 2015. "He now owns a home and lives in Newark's Central Ward community."
  40. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate, January 26, 2015. "He currently lives in Paramus and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  41. ^ Senators of the 114th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed January 26, 2015. "Booker, Cory A. - (D - NJ) Class II; Menendez, Robert - (D - NJ) Class I"
  42. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 11, 2014.
  43. ^ District 25 Legislators, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 11, 2014.
  44. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  45. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  46. ^ What is a Freeholder?, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed October 1, 2013.
  47. ^ a b c Morris County Manual 2014, Morris County Clerk. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  48. ^ Thomas J. Mastrangelo, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  49. ^ David Scapicchio, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  50. ^ Douglas R. Cabana, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  51. ^ John Cesaro, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  52. ^ Kathryn A. DeFillippo, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  53. ^ John Krickus, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  54. ^ William "Hank" Lyon, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  55. ^ Meet the Freeholders, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  56. ^ Ann F. Grossi, Esq., Office of the Morris County Clerk. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  57. ^ About Us: Sheriff Edward V. Rochford, Morris County Sheriff's Office. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  58. ^ What is a Surrogate?, Morris County Surrogate Court. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  59. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Morris, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed December 18, 2012.
  60. ^ "Presidential General Election Results - November 6, 2012 - Morris County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Elections. March 15, 2013. Retrieved December 24, 2014. 
  61. ^ "Number of Registered Voters and Ballots Cast - November 6, 2012 - General Election Results - Morris County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Elections. March 15, 2013. Retrieved December 24, 2014. 
  62. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Morris County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed December 18, 2012.
  63. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Morris County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed December 18, 2012.
  64. ^ "Governor - Morris County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Elections. January 29, 2014. Retrieved December 24, 2014. 
  65. ^ "Number of Registered Voters and Ballots Cast - November 5, 2013 - General Election Results - Morris County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Elections. January 29, 2014. Retrieved December 24, 2014. 
  66. ^ 2009 Governor: Morris County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed December 18, 2012.
  67. ^ a b Our District, Chester School District. Accessed January 5, 2014. "The school district serves two municipalities, Chester Borough and Chester Township. The Borough of Chester is a 1.6 square mile village centered on a main street lined with specialty shops, old homes, and historic buildings.... The surrounding Chester Township is a 29.3 square mile residential community made up of farms, estates, and attractive housing developments."
  68. ^ District information for Chester Township School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed February 3, 2015.
  69. ^ School Data for the Chester Township Public School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed February 3, 2015.
  70. ^ Dickerson Elementary School, Chester School District. Accessed January 5, 2014.
  71. ^ Bragg Intermediate School, Chester School District. Accessed January 5, 2014.
  72. ^ Black River Middle School, Chester School District. Accessed January 5, 2014.
  73. ^ Schools, Chester School District. Accessed January 5, 2014.
  74. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Chester School District, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed January 5, 2014.
  75. ^ West Morris Regional High School District 2014 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed February 3, 2015. "Established in 1958, the West Morris Regional High School District operates two schools, West Morris Central High School and West Morris Mendham High School. The district serves the students of five Morris County communities, Chester Borough, Chester Township, Mendham Borough, Mendham Township and Washington Township, in grades 9 through 12. Students from Washington Township attend West Morris Central High School, and students from the Chesters and the Mendhams attend West Morris Mendham High School."
  76. ^ Morris County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed July 18, 2014.
  77. ^ Town Information, Borough of Chester. Accessed July 19, 2011.
  78. ^ Morris County Bus/Rail Connections, New Jersey Transit. Accessed June 21, 2007.
  79. ^ Lois Barker, All-American Girls Professional Baseball League Players Association. Accessed April 28, 2015.
  80. ^ Staff. "All American Jersey Girl", New Jersey Baseball Magazine, Fall 2005. Accessed April 28, 2015. "Fortunately for baseball purists everywhere, Tommie ate regularly enough while growing up in Chester, New Jersey to make it to tryouts for the All American Girls Professional Baseball League (AAGPBL) in 1949."
  81. ^ Staff. "Thorlabs opens new facility in Newton", Star-Gazette, March 23, 2012. Accessed April 28, 2015. "The company has been growing dramatically since it was started by Alex Cable in the basement of his parents' Chester, NJ home in 1989."
  82. ^ Staff. "DR.LESTER H. CLEE, CLERGYMAN, DIES; Jersey Pastor Was G.O.P.'s Gubernatorial Choice in '37 Retired in 1950 Started a Boys' Club", The New York Times, March 16, 1962. Accessed April 28, 2015. "After moving to Chester in 1950 he served as Borough Councilman there and later as Mayor."
  83. ^ Larry Maysey Memorial, Chester Historical Society, May 1, 2004. Accessed April 28, 2015. "Larry Maysey Larry Maysey lived in Chester for all of his young life, and he was a friend, a companion and a role model."

External links[edit]