Chester Heights, Pennsylvania

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Coordinates: 39°53′22″N 75°28′15″W / 39.88944°N 75.47083°W / 39.88944; -75.47083
Borough of Chester Heights
Borough
Country United States
State Pennsylvania
County Delaware
Elevation 131 ft (39.9 m)
Coordinates 39°53′22″N 75°28′15″W / 39.88944°N 75.47083°W / 39.88944; -75.47083
Area 2.1 sq mi (5.4 km2)
 - land 2.1 sq mi (5 km2)
 - water 0.0 sq mi (0 km2), 0%
Population 2,481 (2000)
Density 1,184.8 / sq mi (457.5 / km2)
Incorporated 1945
Timezone EST (UTC-5)
 - summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP Code 19017
Area code 610
Location of Chester Heights in Delaware County
Location of Chester Heights in Pennsylvania
Location of Pennsylvania in the United States
Website: http://www.chesterheights.org

Chester Heights is a borough in Delaware County, Pennsylvania, United States. The population was 2,481 at the 2000 census. Most of the borough lies south of U.S. 1, about a mile southwest of Wawa, Pennsylvania.

History[edit]

The History of Chester Heights predates grants of William Penn, when the Swedes had penetrated some distance inland from the Delaware River and had found the rich soil very conducive to productive farming. To a remarkable extent, the area had continued to be so used until the last decade. In the 18th and 19th centuries, the Borough was part of Aston Township, though this northernmost section of Aston did not have a village aspect as such. With the advent of a railroad, which made its first run-through on Christmas Day 1833, a concentration of houses developed. With the reach of the automobile, a settlement of homes sprang up along the oldest road in the Borough. That route—now Valleybrook Road was once known as the "Logtown Road" and was one of the earliest routes from Chester settlement to the interior. It wanders over and along the West Branch of Chester Creek and is noted for its abrupt curves at the Borough's southern end.

An 1836 School Building on Valleybrook Road and Llewellyn Road was, in its day, rented by its owners to Aston for $2 a month for use as the school for this area. It was subsequently known as the Logtown School and changed to the Chester Heights School in 1880. A second, much later stone school building stands in its place today. The Borough was the Fourth Ward of Aston and had been referred to for some time as Chester Heights and Wawa. It was in the northern or "Wawa" area that, over the past one hundred years or more, several large land parcels were acquired for summer residences. To date, most of these tracts have remained relatively unchanged, though they are now used as year-round private residences. ("Wawa" was the Indian name for wild goose.)

In 1852 the cornerstone of the Catholic Church "St. Thomas the Apostle" was laid, and it stands today with the addition of a parochial school and residences. In 1872 an association of Methodists purchased a farm in Aston, incorporating as the Chester Heights Camp-Meeting Associations, and it still convenes each July for religious retreats. The Borough of Chester Heights was officially incorporated in 1945.

Finally, approximately one dozen early fieldstone or brick dwellings remain intact though not necessarily restored. The oldest homes date to 1720 or earlier; many of them were established by 1777 when " a number of the stragglers from the defeated American Army, hungry, demoralized and exhausted in their flight from the field at Brandywine, collected in the neighborhood of Logtown, where they passed the night, sleeping in the outbuildings and open fields."* Altogether, the houses represent an historically valuable span of 18th Century to Victorian Architecture in the Borough.[1]

The Chester Heights Camp Meeting Historic District, Chamberlain-Pennell House, and Stonehaven are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.[2]

Geography[edit]

Chester Heights is located at 39°53′22″N 75°28′15″W / 39.88944°N 75.47083°W / 39.88944; -75.47083 (39.889539, -75.470931)[3].

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough has a total area of 2.1 square miles (5.4 km2), all of it land.

Climate[edit]

The climate in this area is characterized by hot, humid summers and generally mild to cool winters. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Chester Heights has a humid subtropical climate, abbreviated "Cfa" on climate maps.[4]

Climate data for Chester Heights, Pennsylvania
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °C (°F) 5
(41)
6
(43)
11
(52)
18
(64)
23
(74)
28
(83)
31
(88)
29
(85)
26
(78)
19
(67)
13
(55)
7
(44)
18
(64.5)
Average low °C (°F) −2
(28)
−2
(29)
2
(36)
7
(45)
13
(55)
18
(64)
21
(69)
20
(68)
16
(61)
10
(50)
5
(41)
−1
(31)
8.9
(48.1)
Precipitation cm (inches) 8
(3)
6.6
(2.6)
9.4
(3.7)
8.6
(3.4)
9.1
(3.6)
8.9
(3.5)
10.9
(4.3)
9.9
(3.9)
9.7
(3.8)
7.4
(2.9)
8.4
(3.3)
8.1
(3.2)
105
(41.2)
Source: Weatherbase [5]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1940 4,921
1950 7,549 53.4%
1960 8,005 6.0%
1970 597 −92.5%
1980 1,302 118.1%
1990 2,273 74.6%
2000 2,481 9.2%
2010 2,531 2.0%
Est. 2012 2,544 0.5%
Sources:[6][7][8]

As of the census[7] of 2000, there were 2,481 people, 1,056 households, and 664 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,184.8 people per square mile (458.3/km²). There were 1,117 housing units at an average density of 533.4 per square mile (206.4/km²). The racial makeup of the borough was 93.67% White, 2.30% African American, 0.08% Native American, 1.89% Asian, 0.12% Pacific Islander, 0.28% from other races, and 1.65% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.29% of the population.

There were 1,056 households out of which 29.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.7% were married couples living together, 9.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 37.1% were non-families. 29.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.32 and the average family size was 2.93.

In the borough the population was spread out with 23.1% under the age of 18, 6.0% from 18 to 24, 35.2% from 25 to 44, 26.4% from 45 to 64, and 9.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 89.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 85.5 males.

The median income for a household in the borough was $70,236, and the median income for a family was $74,375. Males had a median income of $51,835 versus $43,750 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $37,707. About 2.6% of families and 4.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.2% of those under age 18 and 3.1% of those age 65 or over.

Economy[edit]

A building of the Wawa Food Markets headquarters

Wawa Food Markets has its headquarters in Chester Heights,[9][10] within the Wawa area.[11] As of 2011 about 300 employees work in the headquarters. The Borough of Chester Heights receives a majority of its local services tax from employees of Wawa.[9]

Chester Heights Fire Company[edit]

l http://www.bernardon.com/projects/Chester%20Heights%20Fire%20Company/index.html. = model of Chester Heights Fire Companies new building

The Chester Heights Fire Company was formed in 1947. The station is known as Chester Heights Fire Company Station 71. The fire company still serves the community today and is housed at the corner of Valleybrook road and Llewellyn Rd. there is a plan that during 2012-2014 a new fire station will be built behind th existing fire station and then the existing fire station will be knocked down. The fire station currently operates an engine (Engine 71), A rescue truck ( Rescue 71) a QRS (Quick Response Service) (QRS 71) and a utility pick up truck ( Utility 71). The fire Company is fully volunteer and serves the borough of Chester Heights Along With mutual Aid in surrounding townships. There is a plan for a new firehouse and borough building between 2012 and 2014. In Fall and Winter of 2012, the borough is hoping to clear out the brush beside the building and to knock down the house that is on the corner of Valleybrook Rd and Llewellyn Rd. The station is going to be built behind the building that serves as the fire company today and then the old building will be knocked down. the house belonged to the Disolvos who donated it to the Chester Heights Fire Company for training. The Disolvos were big supporters of the fire company and use to be part of the fire company. The house is currently being used for training by the Chester Heights Fire Company. The station is going to be built behind the building that serves as the fire company today and then the old building will be knocked down. This is so that even through the process of moving to the new building, the company can still serve the residents of Chester Heights. The company today has Approx. 50 members.

References[edit]

  1. ^ History of Delaware County, Pennsylvania, Henry Graham Ashmead, 1884, page 293
  2. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2010-07-09. 
  3. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  4. ^ Climate Summary for Chester Heights, Pennsylvania
  5. ^ "Weatherbase.com". Weatherbase. 2013.  Retrieved on October 19, 2013.
  6. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 11 December 2013. 
  7. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  8. ^ "Incorporated Places and Minor Civil Divisions Datasets: Subcounty Resident Population Estimates: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". Population Estimates. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 11 December 2013. 
  9. ^ a b Stark, Kenn. "Chester Heights mulls options in light of proposed tax hike." Delaware County Daily Times. Monday December 5, 2011. Retrieved on September 16, 2012. "Currently, about 300 Wawa employees work at the Red Roof corporate headquarters in Chester Heights."
  10. ^ "Borough of Chester Heights Zoning Map." (Archive) Borough of Chester Heights. Retrieved on September 16, 2012.
  11. ^ Mayer, Cynthia. "Pay A Visit To Wawa, The Place." Philadelphia Inquirer. June 15, 1989. D4. p. 1. Retrieved on September 16, 2012.

External links[edit]