Chesterfield Township, New Jersey

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Chesterfield Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Chesterfield
Chesterfield Township highlighted in Burlington County. Inset map: Burlington County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Chesterfield Township highlighted in Burlington County. Inset map: Burlington County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Chesterfield Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Chesterfield Township, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°07′13″N 74°39′13″W / 40.120242°N 74.653491°W / 40.120242; -74.653491Coordinates: 40°07′13″N 74°39′13″W / 40.120242°N 74.653491°W / 40.120242; -74.653491[1][2]
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Burlington
Formed November 6, 1688
Royal charter January 10, 1713
Incorporated February 21, 1798
Government[6]
 • Type Township
 • Mayor Jeremy Liedtka (term ends December 31, 2014)[3][4]
 • Clerk Caryn Hoyer[5]
Area[2]
 • Total 21.520 sq mi (55.735 km2)
 • Land 21.334 sq mi (55.254 km2)
 • Water 0.186 sq mi (0.481 km2)  0.86%
Area rank 131st of 566 in state
14th of 40 in county[2]
Elevation[7] 92 ft (28 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10]
 • Total 7,699
 • Estimate (2013)[11] 7,760
 • Rank 297th of 566 in state
21st of 40 in county[12]
 • Density 360.9/sq mi (139.3/km2)
 • Density rank 465th of 566 in state
32nd of 40 in county[12]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08515 - Crosswicks[13]
Area code(s) 609 exchanges: 291, 298[14]
FIPS code 3400512670[15][2][16]
GNIS feature ID 0882109[17][2]
Website www.chesterfieldtwp.com

Chesterfield Township is a township in Burlington County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 7,699,[8][9][10] reflecting an increase of 1,744 (+29.3%) from the 5,955 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 803 (+15.6%) from the 5,152 counted in the 1990 Census.[18]

Chesterfield has permanently preserved more than 7,000 acres (2,800 ha) of farmland through state and county programs and a township-wide transfer of development credits program that directs future growth to a designated "receiving area" known as Old York Village, which is a neo-traditional, New Urbanism community built on 560 acres (230 ha) incorporating a variety of housing types, neighborhood commercial facilities, a new elementary school, civic uses, and active and passive open space areas with preserved agricultural land surrounding the planned village. Construction began in the early 2000s and a significant percentage of the community is now complete. Old York Village was the winner of the American Planning Association's National Outstanding Planning Award in 2004.[19][20][21]

Geography[edit]

Chesterfield Township is located at 40°07′13″N 74°39′13″W / 40.120242°N 74.653491°W / 40.120242; -74.653491 (40.120242,-74.653491). According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 21.520 square miles (55.735 km2), of which, 21.334 square miles (55.254 km2) of it was land and 0.186 square miles (0.481 km2) of it (0.86%) was water.[1][2]

History[edit]

The land was first settled in 1677, when a group of primarily Quaker immigrants from England established the village of Crosswicks, the oldest of the three communities of the township. The village was named after the Crosswicks Creek that separates Burlington and Mercer counties. [22] The other two villages were Recklesstown (now Chesterfield) and Plattsburg (now Sykesville).[23] Recklesstown was named in honor of one of its founders, Joseph Reckless, until the community's name was changed in 1888 at the urging of a Congressman and local resident in the face of public scorn.[24]

Chesterfield Township was originally formed on November 6, 1688. It was named after the 2nd Earl of Chesterfield whose seat was in Derbyshire, where many of the township’s earliest settlers had lived. The township was reformed by Royal charter on January 10, 1713, and was incorporated as one of New Jersey's initial 104 townships by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 21, 1798. Portions of the township were taken to form New Hanover Township (December 2, 1723) and Bordentown borough (December 9, 1825).[25]

Crosswicks played a role during the American Revolutionary War. On June 23, 1778, British soldiers near the Crosswicks Creek shot the horse out from under Elias Dayton, a captain with the New Jersey militia. A cannonball from the period remains lodged in the side of the Friends Meeting House.[26]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1810 1,839
1820 2,087 13.5%
1830 2,385 14.3%
1840 3,438 * 44.2%
1850 1,789 −48.0%
1860 1,628 −9.0%
1870 1,748 7.4%
1880 1,525 −12.8%
1890 1,253 −17.8%
1900 1,143 −8.8%
1910 1,130 −1.1%
1920 1,133 0.3%
1930 1,269 12.0%
1940 1,766 39.2%
1950 2,020 14.4%
1960 2,519 24.7%
1970 3,190 26.6%
1980 3,867 21.2%
1990 5,152 33.2%
2000 5,955 15.6%
2010 7,699 29.3%
Est. 2013 7,760 [11][27] 0.8%
Population sources:
1800-1920[28] 1840[29] 1850-1870[30]
1850[31] 1870[32] 1880-1890[33]
1890-1910[34] 1910-1930[35]
1930-1990[36] 2000[37][38] 2010[8][9][10]
* = Lost territory in previous decade[25]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 7,699 people, 1,539 households, and 1,311 families residing in the township. The population density was 360.9 per square mile (139.3/km2). There were 1,601 housing units at an average density of 75.0 per square mile (29.0/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 53.98% (4,156) White, 29.12% (2,242) Black or African American, 0.51% (39) Native American, 8.35% (643) Asian, 0.03% (2) Pacific Islander, 5.01% (386) from other races, and 3.00% (231) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 13.08% (1,007) of the population.[8]

There were 1,539 households, of which 46.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 75.7% were married couples living together, 6.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 14.8% were non-families. 10.6% of all households were made up of individuals, and 3.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.02 and the average family size was 3.26.[8]

In the township, 17.8% of the population were under the age of 18, 36.2% from 18 to 24, 24.4% from 25 to 44, 16.1% from 45 to 64, and 5.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 24.4 years. For every 100 females there were 220.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 268.5 males.[8] The census statistics above include residents of a state youth detention center located at the northwest edge of Chesterfield Township, on the border with Hamilton Township.[citation needed]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $113,125 (with a margin of error of +/- $10,124) and the median family income was $120,288 (+/- $8,240). Males had a median income of $76,563 (+/- $13,303) versus $58,229 (+/- $12,489) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $20,655 (+/- $4,105). About 0.0% of families and 0.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 0.0% of those under age 18 and 2.0% of those age 65 or over.[39]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[15] there were 5,955 people, 899 households, and 744 families residing in the township. The population density was 278.1 people per square mile (107.4/km²). There were 924 housing units at an average density of 43.1 per square mile (16.7/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 49.71% White, 37.36% African American, 0.67% Native American, 0.64% Asian, 0.08% Pacific Islander, 8.45% from other races, and 3.09% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 12.34% of the population.[37][38] The census statistics above included 3,341 residents of state correctional facilities located in the township.[40][41]

There were 899 households out of which 38.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 72.6% were married couples living together, 6.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 17.2% were non-families. 12.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 4.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.91 and the average family size was 3.19.[37][38]

In the township the population was spread out with 11.8% under the age of 18, 40.7% from 18 to 24, 29.8% from 25 to 44, 12.6% from 45 to 64, and 5.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 25 years. For every 100 females there were 345.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 423.4 males.[37][38]

The median income for a household in the township was $85,428, and the median income for a family was $91,267. Males had a median income of $50,305 versus $44,659 for females. The per capita income for the township was $17,193. [The per capita income figure is artificially low due to the above-mentioned youth detention center population] About 0.4% of families and 1.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including none of those under age 18 and 1.0% of those age 65 or over.[37][38]

Real estate[edit]

Chesterfield Township real estate prices were ranked second-highest in Burlington County by Philadelphia magazine in February 2010. Average real estate prices were listed at $411,000, behind Moorestown Township which was rated highest in the county with an average real estate price of $463,000.[42]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Chesterfield Township is governed under the Township form of government with a three-member Township Committee. The Township Committee is elected directly by the voters at-large in partisan elections to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with one seat coming up for election each year as part of the November general election in a three-year cycle.[6] At an annual reorganization meeting, the Township Committee selects one of its members to serve as Mayor and another as Deputy Mayor, which by tradition has the committeeperson serving the last year of term in office chosen to serve as mayor. The Township Committee serves both as the township's executive and legislative body, and derives from the state statutes which delegates powers, prescribe the offices and structure and establish various procedures under which the Township must operate.[3]

As of 2014, members of the Chesterfield Township Committee are Mayor Jeremy Liedtka (R, 2014), Deputy Mayor Michael Hlubik (R, 2015) and Committeeman Alexander Robotin (R, 2016).[3][43][44][45][46]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Chesterfield Township is located in the 3rd Congressional District[47] and is part of New Jersey's 12th state legislative district.[9][48][49] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Chesterfield Township had been in the 30th state legislative district.[50] Prior to the 2010 Census, Chesterfield Township had been part of the 4th Congressional District, a change made by the New Jersey Redistricting Commission that took effect in January 2013, based on the results of the November 2012 general elections.[50]

New Jersey's 3rd Congressional District is represented by Jon Runyan (R, Mount Laurel Township).[51] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[52][53] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[54][55]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 12th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Samuel D. Thompson (R, Old Bridge Township) and in the General Assembly by Robert D. Clifton (R, Matawan) and Ronald S. Dancer (R, Plumsted Township).[56] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[57] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[58]

Burlington County is governed by a Board of chosen freeholders, whose five members are elected at-large in partisan elections to three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year.[59] The board chooses a director and deputy director from among its members at an annual reorganization meeting held in January.[59] As of 2014, Burlington County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Bruce Garganio (R, 2014; Florence Township),[60] Deputy Director Joseph Howarth (R, 2014; Evesham Township)[61] Aimee Belgard (D, 2015; Edgewater Park Township),[62] Joseph B. Donnelly (R, 2016; Cinnaminson Township)[63] and Joanne Schwartz (D, 2015; Southampton Township).[64][59][65] Gargiano was named in March 2014 to serve the unexpired term of Leah Arter and was chosen to fill her position as Freeholder Director.[66]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 2,855 registered voters in Chesterfield Township, of which 682 (23.9% vs. 33.3% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 864 (30.3% vs. 23.9%) were registered as Republicans and 1,304 (45.7% vs. 42.8%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 5 voters registered to other parties.[67] Among the township's 2010 Census population, 37.1% (vs. 61.7% in Burlington County) were registered to vote, including 45.1% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 80.3% countywide).[67][68]

In the 2012 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 1,195 votes here (49.1% vs. 58.1% countywide), ahead of Republican Mitt Romney with 1,189 votes (48.8% vs. 40.2%) and other candidates with 37 votes (1.5% vs. 1.0%), among the 2,436 ballots cast by the township's 3,129 registered voters, for a turnout of 77.9% (vs. 74.5% in Burlington County).[69][70] In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 1,089 votes here (49.4% vs. 58.4% countywide), ahead of Republican John McCain with 1,058 votes (48.0% vs. 39.9%) and other candidates with 32 votes (1.5% vs. 1.0%), among the 2,204 ballots cast by the township's 2,681 registered voters, for a turnout of 82.2% (vs. 80.0% in Burlington County).[71] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 896 votes here (54.8% vs. 46.0% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 713 votes (43.6% vs. 52.9%) and other candidates with 19 votes (1.2% vs. 0.8%), among the 1,636 ballots cast by the township's 1,986 registered voters, for a turnout of 82.4% (vs. 78.8% in the whole county).[72]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 975 votes here (64.6% vs. 61.4% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 476 votes (31.5% vs. 35.8%) and other candidates with 30 votes (2.0% vs. 1.2%), among the 1,509 ballots cast by the township's 3,138 registered voters, yielding a 48.1% turnout (vs. 44.5% in the county).[73][74] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 837 votes here (55.1% vs. 47.7% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 580 votes (38.2% vs. 44.5%), Independent Chris Daggett with 57 votes (3.8% vs. 4.8%) and other candidates with 34 votes (2.2% vs. 1.2%), among the 1,518 ballots cast by the township's 2,786 registered voters, yielding a 54.5% turnout (vs. 44.9% in the county).[75]

Education[edit]

The Chesterfield School District serves students in public school for Kindergarten through sixth grade at Chesterfield Elementary School. As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's one school had an enrollment of 575 students and 42.1 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 13.66:1.[76] A new school for grades K-6 was planned based on the results of a referendum passed in December 2007 that provided for spending of $37.7 million towards the project.[77] The new school opened in January 2011, after having been pushed back from an original target opening date of September 2010.[78]

Public school students in seventh through twelfth grades attend the schools of the Northern Burlington County Regional School District, which also serves students from Mansfield Township, North Hanover Township and Springfield Township, along with children of United States Air Force personnel based at McGuire Air Force Base.[79][80] The schools in the district (with 2011-12 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[81]) are Northern Burlington County Regional Middle School[82] for grades 7 and 8 (737 students) and Northern Burlington County Regional High School[83] for grades 9-12 (1,230 students).[84] Both schools are in the Columbus section of Mansfield Township. Using a formula that reflects the population and the value of the assessed property in each of the constituent municipalities, taxpayers in Chesterfield Township pay 21.6% of the district's tax levy, with the district's 2013-14 budget including $35.6 million in spending.[85]

Students from Chesterfield Township, and from all of Burlington County, are eligible to attend the Burlington County Institute of Technology, a countywide public school district that serves the vocational and technical education needs of students at the high school and post-secondary level at its campuses in Medford and Westampton Township.[86]

Transportation[edit]

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 58.79 miles (94.61 km) of roadways, of which 38.50 miles (61.96 km) were maintained by the municipality, 18.17 miles (29.24 km) by Burlington County and 2.12 miles (3.41 km) by the New Jersey Turnpike Authority.[87]

Major county roads that pass through include Route 528, Route 537 and Route 545.

The New Jersey Turnpike (Interstate 95) passes through the northwestern part of the township, entering on the western border with Bordentown Township and continuing for approximately 2.1 miles (3.4 km) into Hamilton Township in Mercer County.[88] The nearest interchange is Exit 7 in neighboring Bordentown Township.[89]

From 2004 when plans were announced until its completion in early November of 2014, the Turnpike was widened along a 35-mile (56 km) stretch between Interchange 6 in Mansfield Township to Interchange 9 in East Brunswick Township in Middlesex County. Two new carriageways (to accommodate the outer roadways, or truck lanes) were built from Interchange 6 to Interchange 8A in Monroe Township, Middlesex County, and an additional lane on the existing outer roadways was added as well between Interchanges 8A and 9, bringing the roadway up to 12 lanes of traffic in a 3-3-3-3 "dual-dual" configuration of separate truck and car lanes in each direction.[90][91]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Chesterfield Township include:

References[edit]

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  3. ^ a b c Township Committee, Chesterfield Township. Accessed November 10, 2014.
  4. ^ 2014 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs, as of December 15, 2014. Accessed December 26, 2014.
  5. ^ Clerk, Chesterfield Township. Accessed June 18, 2012.
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  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Chesterfield, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 5, 2013.
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  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 6. Accessed January 6, 2013.
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  19. ^ "Old York Village, Chesterfield Wins an American Planning Association Award for an Outstanding Project/ Program/ Tool"
  20. ^ "Old York Village Implementing Smart Growth"
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  24. ^ Chesterfield Township: Recklesstown Historic District, accessed April 26, 2007. "What is now the unincorporated village of Chesterfield was known as Recklesstown in the 18th and early 19th centuries. Its name derived not from the behavior of its inhabitants, but from one of its founders, Joseph Reckless. The name was changed in 1888, when the then Congressman for the district, himself a resident of the village, thought it an object of ridicule."
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  41. ^ FISCAL NOTE ASSEMBLY, No. 3331 STATE OF NEW JERSEY 211th LEGISLATURE, New Jersey Legislature, December 13, 2004. Accessed October 25, 2012. "As of March 12, 2004, the Albert C. Wagner Youth Correctional Facility and the Garden State Youth Correctional Facility, located in Chesterfield Township housed a total of 3,000 inmates. The 2000 census indicates that the township population less the correctional population totaled 2,625 individuals."
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  73. ^ 2013 Governor: Burlington County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, January 29, 2014. Accessed December 25, 2014.
  74. ^ Number of Registered Voters and Ballots Cast November 5, 2013 General Election Results : Burlington County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, January 29, 2014. Accessed December 25, 2014.
  75. ^ 2009 Governor: Burlington County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed December 25, 2014.
  76. ^ District information for Chesterfield Township School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed November 10, 2014.
  77. ^ Walsh, Jim. "School repair plan rejected in Deptford", Courier-Post, December 12, 2007. Accessed July 19, 2011. "But residents approved a $37.7 million plan for a new elementary school in fast growing Chesterfield, Burlington County..."
  78. ^ Chesterfield School District 2013 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed November 10, 2014. "In response to this growth, the district opened a new, state-of-the-art school in January 2011."
  79. ^ Northern Burlington County Regional School District 2013 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed November 10, 2014. "The Northern Burlington County Regional Middle School and High School are located in Mansfield Township. Its constituent elementary districts are Chesterfield, Mansfield, North Hanover, and Springfield Townships. In addition, the district serves the Children of United States Air Force personnel stationed at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst."
  80. ^ Esposito, Martha. "Discover Burlington County 2013: Regional School Districts", Burlington County Times, March 14, 2012, Updated May 9, 2013. Accessed November 10, 2014. "NORTHERN BURLINGTON COUNTY REGIONAL - Serves: Chesterfield, Mansfield, North Hanover, Springfield"
  81. ^ School Data for the Northern Burlington County Regional School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed November 10, 2014.
  82. ^ Northern Burlington County Regional Middle School, Northern Burlington County Regional School District. Accessed November 10, 2014.
  83. ^ Northern Burlington County Regional High School, Northern Burlington County Regional School District. Accessed November 10, 2014.
  84. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Northern Burlington County Regional School District, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed November 10, 2014.
  85. ^ Zimmaro, Mark. "Sharp tax increase included in Northern Burlington budget", Burlington County Times, April 8, 2013. Accessed November 10, 2014. "The $35.6 million budget represents a 2.7 percent increase from last year’s spending plan.... Tax rates in sending districts are determined using an state equalization formula that takes into account factors such as population and assessed values. Based on the formula, Chesterfield taxpayers fund 21.6 percent of Northern Burlington’s tax levy, Mansfield 46.5 percent, North Hanover 14.2 percent and Springfield 17.7 percent."
  86. ^ Why Choose BCIT?, Burlington County Institute of Technology. Accessed November 23, 2013.
  87. ^ Burlington County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed November 23, 2013.
  88. ^ Interstate 95 / New Jersey Turnpike Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation, October 2001. Accessed November 23, 2013.
  89. ^ Travel Resources: Interchanges, Service Areas & Commuter Lots, New Jersey Turnpike Authority. Accessed November 23, 2013.
  90. ^ NJ Turnpike Interchange 6 to Widening program Overview, New Jersey Turnpike Authority. Accessed November 21, 2013. "The NJ Turnpike Interchange 6 to 9 Widening Program (Widening Program) consists of approximately 35 miles of road widening and associated interchange improvements from the vicinity of Interchange 6, in Mansfield Township, Burlington County (Milepost 48) to just south of Interchange 9 in East Brunswick Township, Middlesex County (Milepost 83)."
  91. ^ Gov. Christie, NJDOT Commissioner FoxPraise $2.3 Billion NJ Turnpike Infrastructure Investment Project, New Jersey Turnpike Authority. Accessed November 3, 2014. "The Widening Program created a three-lane Outer Roadway in each direction over the 25 miles between Interchange 6 in Mansfield Township, Burlington County, and Interchange 8A in Monroe Township, Middlesex County."
  92. ^ Caldwell, Dave. "Sprinter Turned Driver Is a Quick Study in Acceleration", The New York Times, August 30, 2009. Accessed November 26, 2013. "Brown, a 33-year-old native of Chesterfield, N.J., could become the first African-American to win a major N.H.R.A. championship.... Brown lived in Trenton until he was 6. When his grandfather died, his family moved to his grandmother’s 10-acre farm in Chesterfield, in the rural part of Burlington County."
  93. ^ The Cast Iron Plow, Today in Science History. Accessed November 26, 2013. "Charles Newbold, born in Chesterfield, NJ (1980), spent his teenage years investigating the use of cast iron to improve on the heavy iron-clad wooden plow then available. He was issued the first US patent for a plow on 26 June 1797."

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