Chez l'Ami Louis

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Chez l'Ami Louis (French pronunciation: ​[ʃe lami lwi], Our friend Louis's) is a restaurant at 32, rue du Vertbois, in the 3rd arrondissement of Paris, France, founded in 1924.

The restaurant, which has been called "the world's most famous bistro"[1] and "the worst restaurant in the world",[2] has only twelve tables and serves meals in a traditional French setting. It was founded by the chef Antoine Magnin, who died about 1987. Gault Millau said of him that he had "an eagle eye for choosing produce" and that the meat and poultry he served was the best in Paris.[1] The current chef is Louis Gadby.[3]

L'Ami Louis specializes in traditional French cuisine, including lamb and foie gras.[4] Notable clients have included Francis Ford Coppola and Alice Waters, who has named it as her favourite restaurant.[1] L'Ami Louis has been visited by Bill Clinton and Jacques Chirac[4] and was the venue for the 70th birthday party of R. W. Apple, Jr..[5]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Ruth Reichl, Paris Bistro is a Rare Pleasure at nytimes.com dated 17 September 1997
  2. ^ A. A. Gill, "Tour De Gall" at Vanity Fair dated April, 2011
  3. ^ New York magazine, vol. 30, issues 25-28 (1997), p. 41
  4. ^ a b Chez L'Ami Louis at 10best.com
  5. ^ Todd S. Purdum, R. W. Apple, a Times Journalist in Full, Dies at 71 dated 4 October 2006 in New York Times online

External links[edit]